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rockbassist
Junior
Username: rockbassist

Post Number: 45
Registered: 8-2005
Posted on Sunday, October 02, 2005 - 10:01 pm:   Edit Post

I am old enough to remember when the Beatles first appeared on Ed Sullivan (barely). I went to see Paul McCartney in Boston the other night and I was blown away. I had never seen him. I'm am so glad that I went. It was the best show that I have ever seen. There was no opening act. He played for 3 hours straight. No breaks. It was AWESOME! He has a great band. In fact his drummer Abe Laboriel, went to Berklee College of Music with my keyboard player Sean. I sometimes tease Sean that Abe got stuck playing with Paul and Sean has the privelege with me. (JUST A JOKE) But give me a break, I am smart enough to do something that McCartney doesn't, I play Alembic! Anyway, at one point it looked like Paul was going to cry. He was alone onstage with an acoustic guitar. He asked all of us to remember George, John and Linda. The crowd cheered very loudly for several minutes. Paul put up his hand in an effort to quiet us down but we just cheered louder. He went to the microphone and said "Oh come one now" and we continued to cheer. This went on for several minutes. He put his head down and wiped his eyes and sang "Yesterday". When he was finished, he wiped his eyes again. I couldn't tell if he was crying but many of the people in the audience were. According to the newspaper, he played 38 songs. All sounded great. Whether you like him or not the fact is that we were all influenced by him whether we realize it or not or want to believe it. He was truly the first bass god. If you get the chance to see him, it is really worth it. Let's face it, he could have played for an hour and people would have left happy. That's not Paul. He gives people what they deserve. A great show. He is 63 years old and is better then most musicians 1/3 his age.
mpisanek
Member
Username: mpisanek

Post Number: 68
Registered: 1-2005
Posted on Monday, October 03, 2005 - 2:13 am:   Edit Post

Kevin:

I am not an avid concertgoer, but had the exact same experience in Dublin last spring. I have stopped going to all concerts except for those on my "must see" list. This list included Paul McCartney.

It is no longer a mystery to me why he is considered to be a superstar. Anyone who can stand at the edge of a piano and speak directly to every person in the audience like he is talking direct to each person is amazing!

At the time of the concert, it was the most expensive ticket I ever purchased. When I walked out of the concert, I said that if there were another concert the next day, I would pay twice as much for a ticket!

He is truly an amazing performer, whether you are a fan of his or not!
gbarchus
Intermediate Member
Username: gbarchus

Post Number: 127
Registered: 6-2002
Posted on Monday, October 03, 2005 - 2:23 am:   Edit Post

I, for one, would have never made a career out of music if it wasn't for Paul McCartney and the Beatles. They were somewhat easy to copy, but mysteriously difficult to reproduce. I learned how to play bass (and guitar for that matter) copying Paul McCartney's bass lines. As his lines developed, so did I. Even today, as I listen to his bass lines, I continue to be amazed at how much melody and rhythm he created on bass. For me, there are still lessons to be learned.
bracheen
Senior Member
Username: bracheen

Post Number: 847
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Monday, October 03, 2005 - 3:27 am:   Edit Post

Kevin
I was at the Miami show, 9/16, and had the same experience. I would like to add that I've never seen an audience as a whole enjoy a concert more. The place was sold out with everyone on their feet. The only complaint that I would have the bass was not clear in the mix. There was just this low rumbling throughout. That was with whomever was playing bass. But overall that was a minor thing. Amazing show. He did seem irritated at one point when someone called out for Yellow Submarine. He just looked in that direction for a few seconds then started playing it so hard I'm surprised he didn't break a string. He was on acoustic guitar at the time. After one verse he stopped and said he was saving that for Ringo's tour.
Sam
gare
Advanced Member
Username: gare

Post Number: 264
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Monday, October 03, 2005 - 5:59 am:   Edit Post

I've been lucky enough to see McCartney several times over the years, and he truely is one of the, if not 'the' best shows I've seen. I especially like his live version of Live and Let Die.
j_gary
Member
Username: j_gary

Post Number: 92
Registered: 6-2005
Posted on Monday, October 03, 2005 - 6:15 am:   Edit Post

I've been fortunate enough to catch this old Englishman three times at his work. About two hundred years ago in Toronto with a little band called the Beatles, a hundred years ago in Detriot with Wings, then the last time he rolled through Michigan at the Palace in Auburn Hills. I can't think of another human being who can write, perform, and play anything in his hands with such style, grace, and humility.

I am so weary of some flavor of the month musician(?) waxing on about how important the music is , how rough life is, and how the planet should be run. Mr. McCartney has somehow kept his ego in check and supplied us with songs, music and performances that entertain, inspire and make us think. He does so with a gentle touch that appears lost to most of mankind.

Just my opinion, I could be wrong. There is always the Gene Simmons and P Ditty shows on how to be a musician and form a band. After last weeks shows I've been practicing lip synching, getting a tongue extention, and learning how to twirl dance while setting my ass on fire.
adriaan
Senior Member
Username: adriaan

Post Number: 622
Registered: 6-2002
Posted on Monday, October 03, 2005 - 6:30 am:   Edit Post

There's something about his attitude in interviews that you see on television ... perhaps it comes from having been treated like a demi-god for several decades ... but what he seems to think is everyday life is in fact the strange life that one may lead only when one is a superstar like Paul McCartney.

Just my 2, of course - which also puts me in perspective financially (duh).
bassman10096
Senior Member
Username: bassman10096

Post Number: 810
Registered: 7-2003
Posted on Tuesday, October 04, 2005 - 4:17 am:   Edit Post

My wife and I have tickets to see Sir Paul in Milwaukee later in the month. I can't wait. I was just listening yesterday to the live compilation from his last US tour. You all are helping remind me how important and how dear this musician has been to me and my music. And how excited I am to finally get to see him perform.

Bill
ox_junior
Advanced Member
Username: ox_junior

Post Number: 273
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Tuesday, October 04, 2005 - 12:46 pm:   Edit Post

To oversimplify things:

Paul wrote probably 60% of the soundtrack of my life.

Paul's music made me hear melody, harmony, and the bass guitar for the first time. I never strayed from any of those three musical basics - anything without a strong melody, catchy harmonies, and a well-constructed bassline is just noise to me.

He always seemed so happy up there on stage. His music has always been uplifting and positive.

Music would not dominate my life the way it has since I was 7 years old, if not for Paul.

One of my ex-bandmates is now Paul's lead guitarist (Rusty Anderson). He was a musical genius back when I played in a band called Drive-Thru Church with him 10 years ago. He has always been strongly Beatle-influenced and this is the perfect gig for him. I am so proud of my friend Rusty.

My mother was also quite Paul-influenced. I have a sister named Michelle and a brother named Paul.

I am only one of millions who have been influenced by this man in this way.

Can I praise him enough?

Mike
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 707
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Tuesday, October 04, 2005 - 5:25 pm:   Edit Post

And obviously Paul contributed to your name too. After all, every time I saw him, starting with that historic Sunday night on the Ed Sullivan show, Paul sang through a "mike"! LOL

Bill, tgo
j_gary
Member
Username: j_gary

Post Number: 94
Registered: 6-2005
Posted on Tuesday, October 04, 2005 - 7:53 pm:   Edit Post

To all who were lucky enough to see him this tour, what kind of gear is he using now? I would think that he would have enough money now to afford an Alembic. Well, maybe not after the recent price increase. Maybe Mrs. McCartney will get a part time job to help the poor lad out, boo hoo, sob, sniff.
ox_junior
Advanced Member
Username: ox_junior

Post Number: 276
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Wednesday, October 05, 2005 - 1:34 am:   Edit Post

J Gary,

I believe that Paul is still using his Hofner 500/1 bass, through Mesa Boogie Amplification. When he plays guitar I believe he uses his sunburst Les Paul through Vox amps. At least that was his lineup on the last tour. I have no doubt that he is still using the Hofner, and probably hasn't changed amps.

Bill, you crack me up! Not only does Paul sing through a "mike", his brother's name is Mike...and my brother Paul's middle name is Michael! It's all bound together mysteriously somehow!
bracheen
Senior Member
Username: bracheen

Post Number: 854
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Wednesday, October 05, 2005 - 3:51 am:   Edit Post

Mike is correct about Paul's gear. The Mesa cabinets are four 1x15. It's still the same. Brian Ray plays a Guild M-85 bass. I couldn't tell what his amps where but he did have two Ashdown 4x10 cabinets.

Sam
ox_junior
Advanced Member
Username: ox_junior

Post Number: 277
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Wednesday, October 05, 2005 - 11:54 am:   Edit Post

Is that what that thing is? I saw that Guild bass on the last tour...knew it was a Guild but couldn't find any data on it anywhere. Thanks for the tip Sam.

And I'll grant that a Hofner is no Alembic, but Paul's Hofner is, I believe, considered to be one of the most valuable musical instruments in the world. Net worth over $1 million - wouldn't be surprised if it was far, far over that. I can't believe the guy takes the thing ON TOUR with him. I believe Geoff (his tech) has it handcuffed to his body, like the President's "nuclear football".
j_gary
Member
Username: j_gary

Post Number: 97
Registered: 6-2005
Posted on Wednesday, October 05, 2005 - 2:57 pm:   Edit Post

I find it amazing that he still breaks out that old Hofner. It must be an English thing as my Father , an off the boat Englishman, keeps things forever, cars, clothes, tools, everything. When I would ask about updating, his mantra was," Why, this one works fine". I wish I was more like him. I'd be curious if our brothers accross the pond feel they keep their gear longer than us in the colonies.

Thanks gentlemen for the equipment update. I own a Hofner and she can be a little tricky to play. I wonder what the reason is that he still uses the old girl, sound, emotion, comfort? Whatever the reason, it is cool to see him with her after all these years.

For giggles, what would you do if you ended up owning Sir McCartney's Hofner? Play it, sell it, hide it? I think I would be scared silly about something bad happening to her while in my care. I think a lot of pressure would come with ownership. I'd have to play the thing, YIKES!
rockbassist
Junior
Username: rockbassist

Post Number: 46
Registered: 8-2005
Posted on Wednesday, October 05, 2005 - 8:15 pm:   Edit Post

I'm not sure that he is playing the same old Hofner. He was on television recently saying that he paid $35 pounds for that bass in the early 1960's. I think that he has it hanging on a wall somewhere. Since then, he has had several made for him. If I had the original, I think that I would play it on occasion. Maybe record with it and then put it away. A good friend of mine has the Stratocaster that Mark Farner of Grand Funk Railroad wrote and recorded "I'm Your Captain" with. Mark gave it to him as a gift. We played a few gigs with it but now he hides it in his basement. Obviously, it's not the same as the legendary Hofner of Sir Paul but it is an important part of rock history.
jacko
Advanced Member
Username: jacko

Post Number: 362
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Thursday, October 06, 2005 - 3:01 am:   Edit Post

According to an interview in this months Bass Player magazine, he has had the intonation issues with his first hofner 'sorted', playing it exclusively on the new album and only having his second hofner and his rickenbacker on stage as backups.

Graeme
borisspyder
New
Username: borisspyder

Post Number: 7
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Thursday, October 06, 2005 - 5:22 am:   Edit Post

I don't know about McCartney's Hofner, but I've got one of Entwistle's last Status Buzzards. I play it frequently in the house but only gig with it twice a year: the anniversary of his death & the anniversary of his birth. When it's out of the house I NEVER put it down, not even for a second. It's frightening to think of losing something you can't replace.
j_gary
Member
Username: j_gary

Post Number: 98
Registered: 6-2005
Posted on Thursday, October 06, 2005 - 7:14 am:   Edit Post

Hi Graeme, very interesting, "sorted out". I bet he has no idea what, if anything, was done to that old battle stick. If I were his tech, ( does he even have one? ), I'd send the baby to Alembic to sort her out. On second thought, if that is indeed the Hofner on his new CD, I would not touch it. Damn this is posessed.

I've been trying to get my subscription to "Bass Player" fired up again, and having some difficulty. Anyone else having trouble? I'm ticked I missed the McCartney article. They must have heard me play and decided I'd be better off with "Mop & Broom" magazine.
ox_junior
Advanced Member
Username: ox_junior

Post Number: 278
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Thursday, October 06, 2005 - 10:04 am:   Edit Post

The Hofner Paul plays now is the second one he purchased. His first Hofner he bought in '62 when he became the bassist of the group. This bass had the two pickups close to the neck and was stolen in the late 60's or early 70's, not sure what year (Paul can be seen playing it in the live TV performance of "Revolution" on the Anthology DVD). It was largely retired from service around the time the Beatles started to hit the charts.

The second Hofner, purchased in '63 and still played today, still has a setlist from the Beatles' last tour scotch-taped to the top of it.

Unless this bass has been painstakingly reproduced, down to the setlist, the one he plays on stage today is indeed the original.

I'm sure he still plays it because of its iconic status and the immediate identification with the Beatles that it brings to fans. Plus....I understand he simply LIKES the thing! It is nice and light and easy to play...if the thing can stay in tune.

What would I do with it?

Buy a nice house for my mom.
j_gary
Member
Username: j_gary

Post Number: 100
Registered: 6-2005
Posted on Thursday, October 06, 2005 - 2:05 pm:   Edit Post

Mike, I'm sure you are a nice son, but just a house? How about a Ferrari, tennis courts, bowling alley, a small country, three Alembics, a partridge and a pear tree? (Maybe she won't noticed you slipped in the Alembics)
borisspyder
New
Username: borisspyder

Post Number: 8
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Thursday, October 06, 2005 - 2:49 pm:   Edit Post

In NYC & SoCal a million bucks buys an ok house...no Ferrari, Alembics, etc. Actually, since Claptons most famous Strat "Blackie"went for $1MM, I'm guessing the Hofner is worth a lot more than that.
ox_junior
Advanced Member
Username: ox_junior

Post Number: 279
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Thursday, October 06, 2005 - 2:55 pm:   Edit Post

My mom lives in suburban Detroit, so the price of the Hofner might get her the cool pad plus a Ferrari, a pear tree (but perhaps not the partridge) and a couple more Alembics for her loving son. :-)
jacko
Advanced Member
Username: jacko

Post Number: 365
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Friday, October 07, 2005 - 12:38 am:   Edit Post

Mike.
According to the BP article, the set list was removed so the bass could be 'restored' and the intonation issues resolved. I think this was fairly recently, must re-read the article.

Graeme
j_gary
Intermediate Member
Username: j_gary

Post Number: 103
Registered: 6-2005
Posted on Friday, October 07, 2005 - 6:25 am:   Edit Post

Hi Graeme, I would love to know who did the work on his Hofner, if it says in the article. Seems to me this was not a bass to be restored but rather left as it was.

Mike, I fear now you may only be able to by Mom a house.
j_gary
Intermediate Member
Username: j_gary

Post Number: 105
Registered: 6-2005
Posted on Friday, October 07, 2005 - 6:52 am:   Edit Post

Mike, by by I mean buy not by, bye bye. ( I'm a dope )
ox_junior
Advanced Member
Username: ox_junior

Post Number: 280
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Friday, October 07, 2005 - 1:54 pm:   Edit Post

Wow...too bad they had to remove the setlist. I am sure Paul has enough quid to somehow reattach it, if it didn't fall apart on contact.

I can't recall the name of Paul's "Guitar Master". Geoff something I think? Have to look.

J Gary, I think I got the jist of your message, by the by. :-)
rockbassist
Junior
Username: rockbassist

Post Number: 47
Registered: 8-2005
Posted on Friday, October 07, 2005 - 7:57 pm:   Edit Post

During a recent television interview Paul stated that the original had been stolen and that he bought another one (I believe in 1963). He stated that he did have the '63 bass refinished and mentioned the set list. He also said that he does not take it on the road. He had 2 basses made that were exact copies of the one he bought to replace the stolen bass and that the 63 never leaves his house. He did acknowledge his bass tech and admitted that he is the only person other than Sir Paul that touches the 63 Hofner. It really doesn't matter what he plays, He was great in concert and whether you like him or not he is not only one of the greatest bassists ever he is one of the greatest, song writers and one of the best performers ever. He admitted in concert that there was a point when it didn't matter what the Beatles did, people would have bought it. I hate to sound graphic or insult anybody but from the time that I was 10 years old I said that if The Beatles belched or farted into a microphone people would have bought it just because it was The Beatles. I can't think of any other band that can make that claim. Paul is not one of the best technical players ever but he is one of the best at playing what was right for the song. He did not over play and he rarely under played. He did what was necessary and he and Jonh Lennon complimented each other extremely well. I once heard Paul say that even though Ringo wasn't the best drummer from a technical standpoint, he was one of the best time keepers ever and that's what made him great. He was the right drummer at the right time. It's kind of hard to argue with success.
richbass939
Senior Member
Username: richbass939

Post Number: 419
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Friday, October 07, 2005 - 8:19 pm:   Edit Post

J gary, the BP article (October 2005) says that the intonation work was done in or around the early '90s by Mandolin Bros. in Staten Island. Since then the 1963 Hofner 500/1 has been Paul's main bass.
It mentions that he plays "his main Hofner" (with a newer Hofner and his 1965 Rick as backups) with his live band. The setlist was from their last live show in 1966. It "was removed a few years ago to restore and preserve it".
Mike, Keith Smith is listed as Paul's technical manager for 16 years, and Paul's longtime personal assistant, John Hammell, helps Keith tend to the entire band's gear.
As far as the value of the Hofner, it could end up 50 years from now setting records in the big auction houses like Van Gogh's "Irises" or the like.
Rich
bigredbass
Senior Member
Username: bigredbass

Post Number: 474
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Friday, October 07, 2005 - 8:29 pm:   Edit Post

It may be in the DNA; his drummer's dad is the great Abraham Laboriel, the well-known LA session player, with his own signature bass built by James Tyler.

One day I'll post my homage to Sir Paul, surely one of the biggest in my small collection of BIG influences.

J o e y
j_gary
Intermediate Member
Username: j_gary

Post Number: 106
Registered: 6-2005
Posted on Friday, October 07, 2005 - 9:21 pm:   Edit Post

Thanks Rich, speaks well of Mandolin Bros. that they got the nod for the job. I wish I lived close enough to use them myself.

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