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hifiguy
Junior
Username: hifiguy

Post Number: 31
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Friday, November 24, 2006 - 8:17 pm:   Edit Post

In a post over in "Dreaming" on the headless bass thread a picture was posted of a grievously decapitated, exceedingly beautiful Alembic and I instinctively referred to the bass with a female pronoun. I didn't realize it until I read the posted message.

I have thought of Alembics as "feminine" since the first time I played one. Every other bass I have played in the last 34 years has struck me as genderless or "masculine." Alembics, like ships, are always "she." Why is that my impression?

At the risk of opening up a can of worms, here's my take. A bit of reflection led to the conclusion that Alembics embody strengths traditionally viewed as feminine. They are more expressive, they are more connected to and in touch with the essences of music than other basses. Alembics' style of communication with their partner is open and honest. They are outwardly beautiful, which is important, but it is the inner beauty (the depth of their sound, the playing feel) which only adds to their immediate appeal.

Alembics must be approached with confidence and respect in order to get a favorable response, especially when one is first entering into the relationship. They make you clean up your act (technically speaking) and make you better without changing your core musical personality.

Is it because two of the company's three guiding lights are women? Does it matter? Probably not. I am probably wandering down the road of silliness with this entire concept.

But this remains true: There are Alembics and there is everything else.
jazzyvee
Senior Member
Username: jazzyvee

Post Number: 647
Registered: 6-2002
Posted on Saturday, November 25, 2006 - 12:31 am:   Edit Post

I like your references there. I do consider all my guitars to be feminine actually including non alembics. Guitars have always had a kind of voluptious womanly waistline so that helps to make them feel womanly. I guess that developed practically for playing when seated. In fact I actually have female names for a some of my guitars. (That was an idea I picked up from BB King and the story of his Lucille).

There was a thread about this a while ago and it seems many here also have female names for their basses.
kungfusheriff
Senior Member
Username: kungfusheriff

Post Number: 566
Registered: 8-2003
Posted on Saturday, November 25, 2006 - 8:59 am:   Edit Post

"Guitars are women. Amplifiers are men," Joe Walsh.
jseitang
Intermediate Member
Username: jseitang

Post Number: 185
Registered: 6-2002
Posted on Saturday, November 25, 2006 - 10:17 am:   Edit Post

nuff said!
olieoliver
Senior Member
Username: olieoliver

Post Number: 906
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Saturday, November 25, 2006 - 10:40 am:   Edit Post

Iíd agree with Joe on that. Makes sense too, Iíll let you play though my amp but youíd better bring your own axe.
If you want to play football with brother, no problem. But my wife.......I don't think so.
keavin
Senior Member
Username: keavin

Post Number: 971
Registered: 12-2002
Posted on Saturday, November 25, 2006 - 10:52 am:   Edit Post

Yeah my bass is like my woman she sits on my lap only!.........& Only I get to insert my Plug into her thus turning Her On!
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 1800
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Saturday, November 25, 2006 - 10:59 am:   Edit Post

Keavin:

At the risk of appearing a little un-PC, I have to comment that, unlike a woman, you can turn your Alembic off. Actually, I guess you can turn a woman off too, but with an Alembic you can choose the time, place, and circumstances!

Bill, tgo
keavin
Senior Member
Username: keavin

Post Number: 973
Registered: 12-2002
Posted on Saturday, November 25, 2006 - 11:11 am:   Edit Post

I know, I've been married for almost 15 yrs now
jsaylor
Junior
Username: jsaylor

Post Number: 48
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Saturday, November 25, 2006 - 11:43 am:   Edit Post

It's a guitar or bass. "respect"? it's not living. I just found it funny you said :
"Alembics must be approached with confidence and respect in order to get a favorable response, especially when one is first entering into the relationship." Their musical instruments, not gods. I think some poeple take things too far. Their merely possessions. Theres more important in life my friend. I finnaly realized that last night. There for instead of worrying about buying expensive instruments, I'm going to build myself a warmoth P-bass and just be happy. Life is too short. Play the music.
olieoliver
Senior Member
Username: olieoliver

Post Number: 907
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Saturday, November 25, 2006 - 12:47 pm:   Edit Post

Bill, "un-PC", does that mean you're using a "Mac".

(Message edited by olieoliver on November 25, 2006)
olieoliver
Senior Member
Username: olieoliver

Post Number: 908
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Saturday, November 25, 2006 - 1:01 pm:   Edit Post

Jordan, I'm pretty sure most of us are aware of what is really important in life. While we do appreciate a superb instrument I don't think, (for most here), that we worship our instruments as gods. There is only one God as far as I'm concerned.
We do kid around a lot but we're just having fun.
I do hope that just because you don't play an Alembic you do keep your membership with this forum. I think you'll find that the cats here are a lot of fun to chat with and there is a ton of knowledge available here.

Keeping the 1st commandment, Olie
jsaylor
Junior
Username: jsaylor

Post Number: 49
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Saturday, November 25, 2006 - 1:09 pm:   Edit Post

Olie,
Yeah its cool,but lately ive been thinking about this, and it doesn't make sense to me to waste time concerning myself with expensive custom basses. Im just going to play now and not worry about it.
hifiguy
Junior
Username: hifiguy

Post Number: 34
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Saturday, November 25, 2006 - 1:19 pm:   Edit Post

My point, JSaylor was that you can't really approach an Alembic with the same playing technique and touch that one brings to mass market instruments. You have to know what you're doing and listen to how the instrument responds to how you play it. I waxed rather poetic, albeit rather elliptically and unclearly.

And there are many musical instruments I would approach with exactly the same respect (in the sense that I have it for a person): any decent sized pipe organ, any master-built scoustic stringed instrument (i.e., a Stradivarius, Amati or Guarnerius), a Bosendorfer Imperial Concert Grand Piano to list but a few. These are instruments which are strongly imbued with not merely the craftsmanship, but the the character and "soul" of their creators.

A great instrument teaches the player about him or her self because it presents a broader potential scope of discovery. Good friends have exactly the same effect.
jsaylor
Junior
Username: jsaylor

Post Number: 50
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Saturday, November 25, 2006 - 1:25 pm:   Edit Post

Hifiguy,
I see what your saying. I read it wrong I guess. When I first read it, to me it sounded like you were almost worsiping it. I should have read it twice! For the record, I still like Alembics, but I'm nolonger going to think "man, I wish I had an Alembic" or "I wish my bass sounded like an Alembic"
tbrannon
Advanced Member
Username: tbrannon

Post Number: 249
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Saturday, November 25, 2006 - 4:46 pm:   Edit Post

Jordan,
It doesn't have to be your quest in life- it certainly wasn't mine. I admired Alembic instruments for a looooong time, but as a teacher, husband and father, never thought I would be in a position to own one. I was happy sitting on the forum and absorbing information.

Recently I found myself in a position where I actually had the cash necessary to get an Alembic- I bought a used Rogue from another forum member. I'm not at all sorry that I spent what I spent to get it. I sold a few of my other basses to help offset the cost and I'm heaps happier with this one than I was with the other 3 that I sold. Great deal for me...

I'd say hang around for awhile- build that Warmoth P-bass and have fun- but never say never~
olieoliver
Senior Member
Username: olieoliver

Post Number: 909
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Saturday, November 25, 2006 - 6:02 pm:   Edit Post

Very "educated" advice Toby, and your wenge Rogue is very cool.
olieoliver
Senior Member
Username: olieoliver

Post Number: 910
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Saturday, November 25, 2006 - 6:05 pm:   Edit Post

Sure hope my punctuation was correct. :-)
tbrannon
Advanced Member
Username: tbrannon

Post Number: 250
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Sunday, November 26, 2006 - 12:32 am:   Edit Post

Thanks Olie~ It's a killer bass- Europa/Rogue quick change switches + Signature Electronics. I love it and I'm sure SHE loves me back.

I hope I can afford another one some day (preferably a custom Elan Jazz bass), but if I never get another one, I'll be satisfied. The Rogue is a far better bass than I am a bass player....

EDIT: Lol- I'm not all switched on tonight- I totally missed the pun Olie- good one. Good thing I'm a science guy and not an english teacher. =)

(Message edited by tbrannon on November 26, 2006)
olieoliver
Senior Member
Username: olieoliver

Post Number: 911
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Sunday, November 26, 2006 - 6:43 am:   Edit Post

Toby, then my hypothesis (English teacher) was incorrect.

I have a MK with Europa electronics. At first I wasn't sure I liked them but after getting more familiar with them I really do like them.
tbrannon
Advanced Member
Username: tbrannon

Post Number: 251
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Sunday, November 26, 2006 - 9:39 am:   Edit Post

*rimshot*

Olie-
Your hypothesis may have been incorrect, but you analyzed it well and came to a solid conclusion.

The part I like the most about the signature package + Rogue electronics is having both Q's and the pan between the two filters. Pretty amazing stuff. I'd be dangerous with a Series bass- way too many fiddling options!

(Message edited by tbrannon on November 26, 2006)
jsaylor
Member
Username: jsaylor

Post Number: 51
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Sunday, November 26, 2006 - 10:18 am:   Edit Post

Toby,
What is this Elan Jazz bass you speak of? Alembic made a Jazz bass copy?
tbrannon
Advanced Member
Username: tbrannon

Post Number: 252
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Sunday, November 26, 2006 - 10:42 am:   Edit Post

Jordan,
Here is a link to a thread with my idea + the basses you're wondering about. In my post from Sept 25th, there is a link to the Jazz style Alembic basses currently avaliable at Bass Centre UK- a few posts below that are my ideas for an Alembic Jazz.

BTW: The guy egging me on (crgaston) is who I bought the Rogue from- he's contributing to my delinquency. =)

Toby
crgaston
Advanced Member
Username: crgaston

Post Number: 335
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Sunday, November 26, 2006 - 12:39 pm:   Edit Post

...and he's an English teacher! ;-)

(Message edited by crgaston on November 26, 2006)
jsaylor
Member
Username: jsaylor

Post Number: 52
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Sunday, November 26, 2006 - 2:50 pm:   Edit Post

Toby,
That just ruined my day. Another company...making Fender copys....(sigh).
I always tell people, if you want a Fender, then get a Fender. Nomatter who makes it, the original is always the best.

(Message edited by jsaylor on November 26, 2006)
bob
Senior Member
Username: bob

Post Number: 740
Registered: 11-2002
Posted on Sunday, November 26, 2006 - 3:20 pm:   Edit Post

Well, uhmm, no... About the only think that was approximately copied was the body shape. Not the bridge, tailpiece, peghead, tuners, certainly not the electronics. And oh, they also decided not to mimic the traditional dead spots in the neck, and Alembic doesn't do bolt-ons.

Some people just happen to like a particular body shape, but I don't think anyone could look at these - let alone play them - and call them "Fender copies".

As to whether "the original is always the best", that strikes me as a rather sweeping generalization, but I'd rather not get into that this afternoon. However, I would agree that if you really want (an original) Fender, then that's what you should get.

So try not to let it ruin your day :-)
tbrannon
Advanced Member
Username: tbrannon

Post Number: 253
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Sunday, November 26, 2006 - 3:20 pm:   Edit Post

Jordan,
Why would that ruin your day?

I'd disagree that the original is always the best- in fact, I'd argue that a Fender jazz bass and a jazz inspired Alembic are two completely different beasts-

I like the jazz bass body style, but love the sound, craftmanship and playability of Alembics....makes sense to combine the two doesn't it?

EDIT: Bob beat me to it. =)

(Message edited by tbrannon on November 26, 2006)
jsaylor
Member
Username: jsaylor

Post Number: 53
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Sunday, November 26, 2006 - 4:23 pm:   Edit Post

Ive never owned a Fender, so I don't know about these dead spots, but again, it seems unoriginal for a company to recreate a body shape as a standard model. So many other companys do this aswell. I just hate seeing people steal others designs. Now before you get on my case about this, I don't have a problem with "inspired" designs, but when you completely take someone elses body design, I disrespect that.

(Message edited by jsaylor on November 26, 2006)
bigredbass
Senior Member
Username: bigredbass

Post Number: 1082
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Sunday, November 26, 2006 - 5:54 pm:   Edit Post

I never thought of the BigRedBass or the Yamahas in terms of gender . . . I often imagine, however, who made them, the place they were made, and since I bought them all used, I wonder what they saw and did before I got them. Silly, huh?

I've always said of the BigRedBass: "It owns me, NOT the other way around." So I guess it's an 'it'.

J o e y
crgaston
Advanced Member
Username: crgaston

Post Number: 336
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Sunday, November 26, 2006 - 7:59 pm:   Edit Post

Alembic is a custom company, and will build pretty much what the customer orders. These were built for a store that ordered them this way. They were never a "standard model."

jsaylor
Member
Username: jsaylor

Post Number: 54
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Sunday, November 26, 2006 - 8:56 pm:   Edit Post

I see. Looks like I jumped the gun, yet again. Someone should revoke my gun permit. However look at the California special. Looks an awful alot like a Stratocaster. So if companys just order custom models, then are there any other standard models besides on their model page? Mica told me they have hundreds of templates of all they designed and things based off their standard models.

Edit: And what are these "dead spots" you speak of? Ive heard about them, but never knew what they were. What causes them? Ive only ever heard them said about Fenders, and Fender copies.



(Message edited by jsaylor on November 26, 2006)
davehouck
Moderator
Username: davehouck

Post Number: 4561
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Sunday, November 26, 2006 - 9:09 pm:   Edit Post

As Charles pointed out, those two basses were custom ordered and certainly are not a "standard model". That body shape is not even a listed option.
bob
Senior Member
Username: bob

Post Number: 741
Registered: 11-2002
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 12:14 am:   Edit Post

Jordan, we are way off-topic here, but very briefly: a "dead spot" refers to a point on the neck where you just can't get much sound. You can play the note, but compared to the rest it is quite low in volume, dies out quickly, lacks character, and so forth.

To be fair, this is not unique to Fenders. It's a resonance problem having to do with length and mass of the neck, the frequency of the note, and all sorts of things. It just seems that Fender was unusually consistent about including one of these on their basses (I forget what note, but you can google it), and of course there are a lot of Fenders around, so it's sort of a standing joke.
crgaston
Advanced Member
Username: crgaston

Post Number: 337
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 2:48 am:   Edit Post

Bob, wouldn't it be more of a standing wave?
;-)
olieoliver
Senior Member
Username: olieoliver

Post Number: 912
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 6:57 am:   Edit Post

These dead spots are definitely not exclusive to Fenders. Every bass Iíve owned has had them. The spot is usually around the 5th fret of the 1st string when tuned 440 GDAE. It is also noticeable on the 10th fret of the 2nd string.
Now on my Alembic, Warwick and Kubicki basses they are very slight, almost unnoticeable. My Fender, Daion and Ibanez basses these spots are very prevalent, Fender being the worse.
Iíve never really played any alternate tuning so I wonder if the spot moves when, lets says tuning down a Ĺ or whole step. Maybe Iíll try that tonight and see if it moves.

Now to keep this post ďon topicĒ, I wonder if a ďmaleĒ bass would have the same dead spot. :-)
lg71
Advanced Member
Username: lg71

Post Number: 281
Registered: 3-2006
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 7:22 am:   Edit Post

Do you mean the G spot, or the LG spot? :-)
keurosix
Intermediate Member
Username: keurosix

Post Number: 133
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 12:55 pm:   Edit Post

My PLASTIC, Modulus Graphite neck does not have a dead spot. Dead and active or Live spots tend to be generated from materials that vibrate within the same range of frequencies as the strings fundamental and harmonic vibrations. Whereas graphite, a plastic material has a vibrational frequency much higher than the highest harmonics, so no string enduced vibration gets a sympathetic reaction either in phase or out. Out of phase or a dead note sounds like it is sucked up by the guitar with little or no sustain or volume. Rather annoying.
By the way, my guitars have to be girls when I think about it. I agree with Joe Walsh and Hifi Guy. A more regal calling for worthy examples of art. Also, some foreign languages speak in genders too, so I cannot rule this out!
Kris
hankster
Member
Username: hankster

Post Number: 78
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 2:45 pm:   Edit Post

My Fender P had a dead spot at the 7th fret on the G string, which I've noticed on a number of Fenders. My '79 Stingray had the same. I don't notice one on my Stanley standard, or my old (1980?) Les Paul bass. They are, as noted above, a function of the resonance of the instrument - the denser the better, but, so far as I can tell, they are gender neutral.

Rick
lg71
Advanced Member
Username: lg71

Post Number: 282
Registered: 3-2006
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 3:39 pm:   Edit Post

Anyway, to me, a dead spot is not a big deal... If it sound that dead, you can always hit another note, which will force you to move up and down the neck more often, also, it makes your instrument "special & unique" in a way. If it's got a dead spot, it's gotta have a G spot, no? It's you to find it! ;) how about a beauty spot while we are at it? But what the heck, there is nothing from with a dead spot here and there...
jsaylor
Member
Username: jsaylor

Post Number: 55
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 4:16 pm:   Edit Post

I was playing my Thunderbird tonight, and I didn't notice any deadspots. Weird.

If any of you guys like the art side of basses, check these out: http://www.ritter-royals.com/

Thats some artistic stuff.
lg71
Advanced Member
Username: lg71

Post Number: 283
Registered: 3-2006
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 4:37 pm:   Edit Post

Nice photos - I am gonna buy the Flora Aurum for my Birthday.
olieoliver
Senior Member
Username: olieoliver

Post Number: 915
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 6:04 pm:   Edit Post

I would most definitely say the Ritters are female. They are to pretty to be male.
My luck though, I'd spend a 100K and still have a dead spot.
So its all yours LG. LEt us know how it plays. LOL

(Message edited by olieoliver on November 27, 2006)
lg71
Advanced Member
Username: lg71

Post Number: 284
Registered: 3-2006
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 6:11 pm:   Edit Post

100K? I thought it was 100000 pesetas!
Sorry, I didn't read properly...
olieoliver
Senior Member
Username: olieoliver

Post Number: 916
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 6:18 pm:   Edit Post

Thats still a cool grand, and no Alembic logo on it. :-)
jsaylor
Member
Username: jsaylor

Post Number: 56
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 6:46 pm:   Edit Post

Their not ment to be played, their for the art aspect.
olieoliver
Senior Member
Username: olieoliver

Post Number: 917
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 6:49 pm:   Edit Post

I thought playing music was art?
jsaylor
Member
Username: jsaylor

Post Number: 57
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 6:51 pm:   Edit Post

Visual art them :p.

Hell if I was loaded, Id snacth them up in a heart beat. I love em.
olieoliver
Senior Member
Username: olieoliver

Post Number: 918
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 6:54 pm:   Edit Post

I agree, they look great. Just not in my price range.
hifiguy
Junior
Username: hifiguy

Post Number: 40
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 8:25 pm:   Edit Post

The mammoth ivory on the Ritters is a nice touch. They are mammothly expensive and beautiful, though really, a BOLT-ON neck for $100K? At long last there's something that makes a Series or custom Alembic look affordable.

I could get into playing one of the Flora series basses - that's a gorgeous design. I wonder what kind of electronics are in them.

jsaylor, your T-Bird is a neck through or set neck and thus much less likely to have the bolt-on dead spot. Thanks for posting the very cool link.

Paul
jack
Intermediate Member
Username: jack

Post Number: 112
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Tuesday, November 28, 2006 - 7:40 am:   Edit Post

Oooh, Aaah

jack
Intermediate Member
Username: jack

Post Number: 113
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Tuesday, November 28, 2006 - 7:42 am:   Edit Post

Just noticed, body looks like an eighth note. Cool.
haddimudd
Intermediate Member
Username: haddimudd

Post Number: 181
Registered: 6-2002
Posted on Tuesday, November 28, 2006 - 9:48 am:   Edit Post

Yes, thanks for the link. I didn't know of that maker.

Hartmut
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 1802
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Tuesday, November 28, 2006 - 1:24 pm:   Edit Post

I thought a dead spot was like Winterland or the Avalon Ballroom!

Bill, tgo

I'm in Key West!!!!
olieoliver
Senior Member
Username: olieoliver

Post Number: 922
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Tuesday, November 28, 2006 - 2:22 pm:   Edit Post

Ba-domp-dah!
lg71
Advanced Member
Username: lg71

Post Number: 285
Registered: 3-2006
Posted on Tuesday, November 28, 2006 - 4:16 pm:   Edit Post

A dead spot is, as important as a dead fish - we need them... ;)
jsaylor
Member
Username: jsaylor

Post Number: 58
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Tuesday, November 28, 2006 - 9:00 pm:   Edit Post

Paul,
Bolt on necks can be extremely high quality if a good manufacture is making them. Bolt-ons also have more "bite" and "speak" better to the amps then neck through and set necks. However these basses are his museum basses. Here is his normal website : www.ritter-basses.com. Prices are around the $5000 mark with the triplebuckers. His Raptor comes with laser pickups! Some creative stuff is flowing out of Dutchland.
olieoliver
Senior Member
Username: olieoliver

Post Number: 926
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Wednesday, November 29, 2006 - 5:42 am:   Edit Post

Much more affordable and playable.
bracheen
Senior Member
Username: bracheen

Post Number: 1104
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Wednesday, November 29, 2006 - 9:10 am:   Edit Post

Bill how long have you been in Key West? If you have any extra days you don't know what to do with cruise on up to Jacksonville. I'll buy you a pint.
Sorry, this wasn't the beer thread was it?

Sam
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 1807
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Wednesday, November 29, 2006 - 10:16 am:   Edit Post

Sam:

We got into Miami Monday night. Drove down to KW in a PT Cruiser convertible yesterday. We're down here through Sunday for the annual NORML legal seminar. 130 of the nicest lawyers you could ever meet. Thanks for the invite, but we're driving straight to the airport from here on Sunday.

Last night there were a couple of guys (guitarist and singer), playing on the rooftop bar across the street. I pulled out my Baby Taylor and was jamming with them from my balcony. They saw and invited us over. I did a song and they invited me back anytime this wek. The fiddle player in my band (another lawyer) arrives tonight with fiddle. The guys at the bar said to bring him along. We're gonna have a lot of fun.

Now back to this thread ... here in Key West, gender seems to be fairly irrelevant! LOL

Bill, tgo
hankster
Member
Username: hankster

Post Number: 80
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Wednesday, November 29, 2006 - 12:40 pm:   Edit Post

There's a distinct "Dr. Seuss" flavour to those Ritter basses. Not that that's a bad thing. As in, "My name is McWilliam McBurney MacFigg, and on weekends I play the Bass Thing-a-Majigg". Or something.

Rick
robotdream
New
Username: robotdream

Post Number: 1
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Wednesday, November 29, 2006 - 2:25 pm:   Edit Post

The 'Okon' basses Ritter makes are too close to Carl Thompson's 'scroll bass' designs for my liking. The others are pretty interesting though.
jsaylor
Member
Username: jsaylor

Post Number: 59
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Wednesday, November 29, 2006 - 3:00 pm:   Edit Post

Actually in an interview with Jens, he said that Carl Tompson was an influence. Interview taken from Talk bass
Q: What led you to your current designs and how did you arrive at the various models of basses you build today?

JR: These models are just the result of ideas I had. I always designed basses inside my head when I saw cool stuff like Thompsons or old Atlansias or whatever. So I already had shapes I liked most in my mind before drawing them on paper the first time. Some of them I changed a very little bit, but most are original like in my mind.
lidon2001
Advanced Member
Username: lidon2001

Post Number: 255
Registered: 4-2005
Posted on Wednesday, November 29, 2006 - 3:56 pm:   Edit Post

Sorry gang, but I find this to be a bit sophomoric:

kidding right?

I thought bolt on necks were a compromise for easy change when a neck goes bad. I prefer a luthier who has enough confidence in their choices for the neck wood that they can commit a neck to a bass.

And for the thread:

BalK - female
Pele - goddess of fire
E.T. - ? hermaphroditic alien? I believe it's on the masculine side myself...
hifiguy
Junior
Username: hifiguy

Post Number: 43
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Wednesday, November 29, 2006 - 6:28 pm:   Edit Post

Herr Ritter's less expensive instruments are quite something to look at. Nice to see that he does everything in-house including his pickups and has come up with truly original shapes for the most part. Not many high end bass makers can say that. I hope I get the chance to play a Ritter some day.

Nothin' wrong with bolt on necks - I own three basses with them. The physics of the string vibration are more complicated and variable than with neck-throughs, though.
lidon2001
Advanced Member
Username: lidon2001

Post Number: 256
Registered: 4-2005
Posted on Wednesday, November 29, 2006 - 9:14 pm:   Edit Post

I want to get up to Bass Central and try one. But I've seen pics of two of his basses with the upper horn broke off. I guess the only thing weaker than a Ritter upper horn is an Alembic omega tip. ;) And Les Paul has experimented with multi-coil pickups beyond duals long before Herr Ritter, so I guess I don't see the innovation that others might with regard to his electronics.

And then there's his amboyna bass. Strings go out of tune so I would need tuners and I wouldn't want to rely on a volume pedal for control. lol

Obviously he is of great talent and has a prolific body of work. It will never move me as what we have here does.
dnburgess
Senior Member
Username: dnburgess

Post Number: 496
Registered: 1-2003
Posted on Thursday, November 30, 2006 - 2:04 am:   Edit Post

Green Square Music is presently the Australian representative for only one instrument maker - Alembic. That will change in a few months when we get our first few Ritters. Jens Ritter has great respect for Alembic and exhibits a similar passion - in a teutonic kind of way.
jsaylor
Member
Username: jsaylor

Post Number: 60
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Thursday, November 30, 2006 - 12:33 pm:   Edit Post

David,
The way you phrased that, made it sound like you were putting Ritter below Alembic and/or Jens looks up to Alembics over his own designs. I know thats not what was ment, but thats the vibe I picked up off of it. "Respect" is a loose term, often used to show superiority.
How can your shop survive just selling Alembics? How long have you guys been around?
groovelines
Senior Member
Username: groovelines

Post Number: 418
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Thursday, November 30, 2006 - 2:20 pm:   Edit Post

Jordan, I think it's entirely possible to respect someone and not feel inferior to them. Seems to me that someone with Jens' talent might not suffer from an inferiority complex, he certainly has no issue with creatively expressing himself.
And if all David wanted to sell was one brand, then that's his choice and we should respect that.

On topic, my Alembic is used to express what's inside me, so I guess it's masculine at heart. I'm woefully out numbered in my house by females and a guy's gotta have a friend to talk to.

[edit for typos]

(Message edited by groovelines on November 30, 2006)
adriaan
Senior Member
Username: adriaan

Post Number: 1152
Registered: 6-2002
Posted on Thursday, November 30, 2006 - 3:07 pm:   Edit Post

Jordan (jsaylor) - sorry to bring this up, but you need to get your geography straight.

"Some creative stuff is flowing out of Dutchland."

Germany is known in the local vernacular as Deutschland. The people called the Dutch live in the neighbouring country called "the Netherlands", locally known as Nederland, but known around the world as Holland.

Locally, Holland was the most dominant of the Dutch provinces, until it was split it up into the North and South Holland provinces sometime in the 1800s. If I may assume that you're a US citizen, you should be aware of the Founding Fathers and the example they took from the Dutch republic, which was something quite different from the archaic nobility system in place in Germany around the same time.

The "low countries" or as you might say "nether lands" are Nederland and Belgium , or better: BelgiŽ or la Belgique. They are separate nations, where the northern half of BelgiŽ, known as Vlaanderen or Flanders, shares 90% of its language with Nederland, and the other 10% of its language with the rest of la Belgique, known locally as la Wallonie, as well as with la francophonie - the grand idea that there is Frenchness around the globe.

You should by now be aware that some Germans are putting out very creative stuff, like Jens Ritter, and that the Dutch are always eager to point out those tiny mistakes that you make without meaning any harm. And so I apologize. Anyway ...
jsaylor
Member
Username: jsaylor

Post Number: 61
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Thursday, November 30, 2006 - 8:01 pm:   Edit Post

Adriaan,
Yes I know the difference. I always get the two mixed up.
dnburgess
Senior Member
Username: dnburgess

Post Number: 497
Registered: 1-2003
Posted on Friday, December 01, 2006 - 1:30 am:   Edit Post

Jordan - Green Square Music is a hybrid importer / retailer. We represent Accugroove, Acme, Acoustic Image, Schroeder, Raezer's Edge as well as Alembic and soon Ritter. We wholesale some of our lines to dealers as well as selling direct to customers via phone / net. We carry manufacturers that I like and respect (that word again) and that don't have the volumes to excite the big wholesalers.

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