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tdukes
Intermediate Member
Username: tdukes

Post Number: 109
Registered: 4-2008
Posted on Tuesday, May 12, 2009 - 7:00 pm:   Edit Post

Where do people generally go to get their Alembic's set up, a dealer or a general guitar-tech? Or do you generally do it yourselves?

I wanted to get both my Tribute and Series I guitar set up. Since I am using a different string gauge than was on them when I got them the intonation sounds off to me. I called the local Alembic dealer. Three times they have told me they are too busy to look at my guitar. I had wanted to take it to a dealer since the Alembic's have features that other shops might not be familiar with. Should I worry about that?

For the intonation I was thinking of getting one of these and trying to do it myself. Anyone here have good or bad experience doing this?

I am also having a problem with the D string sticking in the nut. I try to tune from flat to sharp. The pitch stays the same for a while then pops past the correct pitch and winds up sharp. I am hesitant to use a file on the groove in the nut. I did try some GraphitALL Guitar Lube on the string near the nut. It helped some but not for long. Has anyone else had a similar problem?

Todd.
davehouck
Moderator
Username: davehouck

Post Number: 8057
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Tuesday, May 12, 2009 - 7:13 pm:   Edit Post

I think it is the case that most of us do our own setups.

First question; have you read Joey's Setup Post yet?

On the nut problem; two questions.
1 - has it happened with more then one D string?
2 - do you have a magnifying glass?
tdukes
Intermediate Member
Username: tdukes

Post Number: 110
Registered: 4-2008
Posted on Tuesday, May 12, 2009 - 7:35 pm:   Edit Post

I just read the 'Joey's Setup Post.' I assume I would want less relief for a guitar than a bass?

I am doing a search on 'intonation' to see if there is a page likewise on setting up intonation. I found several pages. Looks like I may want to look at the Peterson V-SAM in addition to the VSF.

On the nut. Yes, I have had this problem with two strings. No, I don't have a magnifying glass.

Todd.
davehouck
Moderator
Username: davehouck

Post Number: 8058
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Tuesday, May 12, 2009 - 7:55 pm:   Edit Post

What is it about the setup that you want to change? Is the action too high or too low? Do you have fret buzz?
tdukes
Intermediate Member
Username: tdukes

Post Number: 111
Registered: 4-2008
Posted on Tuesday, May 12, 2009 - 8:13 pm:   Edit Post

Mainly the intonation on the Series I.

Mainly the sticky nut on the Tribute.

I haven't been playing the Tribute as much since I got the Series I, I probably will start again soon. I guess I am most concerned with getting the intonation set on the Series I.

Tuning the Series I with the 5th fret doesn't work real well. Some extended or 'weird' chords (sus2 mostly) sound out of tune when the open strings are in tune. You can tell that the chimes at the 12th fret are out of tune with the fretted 12th fret.

The relief on the Series I seems ok. The relief on the Tribute could probably be improved. The action has raised since I got it and switched to heavier gauge strings.

Todd.
davehouck
Moderator
Username: davehouck

Post Number: 8059
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Tuesday, May 12, 2009 - 8:37 pm:   Edit Post

For setting intonation, read through this thread. In that thread my references to checking at the 5th and 24th frets should not be followed; use the 12th for both the fretted and the harmonic notes. The rest of the information in that thread should be helpful.

There are several members here who own strobe tuners and swear by them. Run a board search for Peterson strobe; you should find several old discussions with recommendations for specific models.

On the Tribute, carefully remove the truss rod cover; tighten each nut about 1/4 turn or less. (Looking at the wrench from the bridge, you will be turning clockwise to tighten.) You should notice a difference. Try that for a while and see what you think.

As a generalization, you generally want to turn both nuts the same amount.

On the nut issue, since it's plated, I'm hesitant to tell you to get a needle file and gently smooth the slot without first knowing for sure what the problem is. If you can borrow a magnifying glass, you might be able to see if there is a rough spot on the nut. Now that I think about it, I think this has been discussed sometime in the past. Hopefully someone with a better memory that mine will notice this thread and help out.
davehouck
Moderator
Username: davehouck

Post Number: 8060
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Tuesday, May 12, 2009 - 8:53 pm:   Edit Post

I found this with a board search. In the following text Bob Novy is replying to someone whose E string was not sitting in the slot properly.

Oh, and it just occurred to me; you did say that you were using thicker gauge strings now. It might be that the new larger D string is too big to sit in the slot properly, in which case the slot will need to be filed a little.

Here's what Bob had to say.

be careful. I would recommend using a needle file (or better yet a nut slot file, but not many of us have those). Ideally, you'd like a half-circle groove that precisely fits the string. However, you don't want to cut it too deep because then the action won't be consistent with the other strings. You also want to have a well-defined witness point, i.e. you do not want to have a rounded, curved entry on the neck side of the saddle, and the back side of the slot has to be deep enough so that the string is fully seated on the front (neck) side.

If you're patient, have good eyes (or a magnifier), and understand the concepts, it's not too hard - otherwise, have someone do it for you.
cozmik_cowboy
Senior Member
Username: cozmik_cowboy

Post Number: 472
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 13, 2009 - 4:46 am:   Edit Post

If you're going to set your intonation, get the strobe. The best accuracy I've seen claimed for a non-strobe tuner is 1 cent; that's for the top-of-the-line Korg rack-mount units - and also for a $30 Intellitouch. They're sufficient (though not optimal) for gig tuning, but a strobe (including the Peterson Virtual Strobe models) are accurate to 0.1 cent. I wouldn't want to do a set up without one.

Peter

(Message edited by cozmik_cowboy on May 13, 2009)
tdukes
Intermediate Member
Username: tdukes

Post Number: 112
Registered: 4-2008
Posted on Wednesday, May 13, 2009 - 4:57 am:   Edit Post

Thanks Dave and Peter. I think I will shop around for the stobe and give a try at setting the intonation. My wife has a magnifier I have ask her to bring home to get a better look at the nut.

Todd.
cje
New
Username: cje

Post Number: 6
Registered: 5-2009
Posted on Wednesday, May 13, 2009 - 7:37 am:   Edit Post

I have a Peterson VSAM. I've used it for years. It sits on top of my rack for every single gig. I have used it for intonation adjustments as well. It is very accurate (MUCH more so than most electronic tuners). It might not be an actual mechanical wheel tuner, but those are finicky and I would not bring them to clubs, etc. The VSAM should do well by almost everyone's standards.

CJ
gtrguy
Intermediate Member
Username: gtrguy

Post Number: 200
Registered: 9-2004
Posted on Wednesday, May 13, 2009 - 9:13 am:   Edit Post

I use a 35 year old Conn tube powered strobe tuner. Works perfect.

Examine the nut slot closeup for burs or flaws. You may be able to sand it smooth with fine sandpaper (use the wet/dry grey colored good stuff) wrapped around the edege of an old credit card. -OR- you can pay someone to use a nut file to do it.

Good luck,
Dave
olieoliver
Senior Member
Username: olieoliver

Post Number: 2376
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 13, 2009 - 9:22 am:   Edit Post

I have/had and old Conn Strobe tuner and loved it. I honestly don't remember what I did with it though. I don't recall selling it. Hmmm maybe need to looking in the attic.

OO
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 3800
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Wednesday, May 13, 2009 - 9:42 am:   Edit Post

Another rousing endorsement for the Peterson virtual strobe tuners. I've had a VS-1 for about 3 years now. No problems. I love it. And, as an added bonus, it is very visible in daylight (outdoor gigs) where the LED readout on the Boss tuners fades away. I'd check out the stroboflip and the strobostomp if I was in the market today.

Bill, tgo
fmm
Advanced Member
Username: fmm

Post Number: 263
Registered: 6-2002
Posted on Wednesday, May 13, 2009 - 7:13 pm:   Edit Post

I love my Stroboflip. It's the only thing I have that will accurately tume my Ashbory...
tdukes
Intermediate Member
Username: tdukes

Post Number: 113
Registered: 4-2008
Posted on Wednesday, May 13, 2009 - 7:17 pm:   Edit Post

I ordered a Peterson VSF today. It should be here next Wed. Thanks for all the help.

My wife forgot the magnifying glass, maybe tomorrow on that.

Todd.
mica
Moderator
Username: mica

Post Number: 6123
Registered: 6-2000
Posted on Wednesday, May 13, 2009 - 8:13 pm:   Edit Post

If the string is catching at the nut, you will probably find a burr that is preventing the string from slipping by when you tune. A careful pass with a file should remove it. If you were here in town, we'd be happy to take care of this for you.

But then I just reread everything in this thread and you mentioned using a larger diameter string in the Tribute than the 10's it was originally setup with. As Dave suggested, you might need to have the nut slots enlarged since running a thicker string through the original slot can bind up even without a burr.
tdukes
Intermediate Member
Username: tdukes

Post Number: 114
Registered: 4-2008
Posted on Friday, May 15, 2009 - 4:26 pm:   Edit Post

Thanks Mica.

I took the Tribute by Dick Dubois today and he fixed it for me while I waited (about 20 minutes)

I highly recommend his work for anyone in the central Texas area.

Todd.
tdukes
Intermediate Member
Username: tdukes

Post Number: 116
Registered: 4-2008
Posted on Wednesday, May 20, 2009 - 1:50 pm:   Edit Post

My Peterson VSF showed up this afternoon. I set the intonation on my Series I. The A, and G were way out but the others were almost dead on. Will try it at practice tonight and see how it goes.

Does anyone know how long the 3 AA will last? One less thing to plug in.

Sam, this is a really cool guitar. Thank you again for selling it to me.

Todd.
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 3831
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Wednesday, May 20, 2009 - 2:59 pm:   Edit Post

My Peterson's batteries last a long time. Of course, I don't leave it on the whole time I'm playing. I use the tuner out on my volume pedal and turn the Peterson on to tune and then off. I probably change batteries once or twice a year, at most. The other guitar in my band keeps his on top of his amp in the signal path, plugs it in and leaves it always on.

Bill, tgo

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