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alembic76407
Advanced Member
Username: alembic76407

Post Number: 370
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Monday, May 30, 2005 - 5:45 pm:   Edit Post

Thing's we love or hate about going to a rock concert.

Hate first; the last concert I went to was Paul McCartney a year or so ago. The girl to my right knew every word to every song that Paul sang, and she sang and sang and sang at the top of her lungs, all night long. I felt like I paid $75.00 to here her sing, and she couldn't carry a note in a bucket, but did that stop her, NOOOOOOOO. to me, perfect pitch would have been ME chunkin her off the balcony!!!!!

now for things I love; ????????????????????????
oh well.


David T
trekster
Junior
Username: trekster

Post Number: 31
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Tuesday, May 31, 2005 - 5:17 am:   Edit Post

heh...when I went to see McCartney at he MCI Center in DC, we got visited by the MCI mighty mouse.

Went with a friend, who is about 6'0 and 400lbs. We got to our seats (4 rows from the back wall) and realized there was no way he was gonna fit in those teeny tiny chairs. After about 15 minutes of squirming, I said "look..there is a guy with an MCI staff badge.. go down, show him your ticket, and see if there is anything they can do." He did, and I got motioned down about 5 minutes later..we were moved 23 rows down and one section over, to an area with folding chairs that could be moved. Nice. Nicer still -- the 3 rows ahead of us before the drop-off were seats not to be sold and covered over. Clear view!

Anyway..about half way through the concert, during Paul ukelele tribute to George, I noticed something move in my lower peripheral vision. I look down, and there is a mouse, walking down the covered seats like he owned the place. I elbow my friend, point, and he looks down just in time to see the mouse crawl into his jacket pocket (which he had thrown over the seats infront of us). We look at each other in amazement, then look down again to see the mouse crawl out.

To this day I still have no idea what Paul played after the Uke tribute, I was laughing soooo hard.

--T
kmh364
Senior Member
Username: kmh364

Post Number: 879
Registered: 9-2003
Posted on Tuesday, May 31, 2005 - 5:56 am:   Edit Post

$75...that's all? The Eagles were double that, plus! Crue was $100 in Vegas (Hard Rock) for gen. admission! I'm going to see Skynyrd in a couple of weeks at a glorified bar for $68 plus "fees", and it's general admission!!! You should count your lucky stars that you "only" paid $75 to be serenaded by your involuntary unwanted neighbour!

Seriously, these days, you really have to be a glutton for punishment to go out and see a show. I love to see live music, but I don't love the prices and the obnoxious concert goers. There have been many threads on this site RE: this topic (some of which I've started and/or contributed to), all with the same conclusion: Most of us (myself especially) are getting too friggin'' old for this s**t, LOL!
bracheen
Senior Member
Username: bracheen

Post Number: 730
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Tuesday, May 31, 2005 - 9:21 am:   Edit Post

$68 for Lynyrd Skynard, wow. They used to open for just about every act that came to Jacksonville in the early 70s plus play other venues with no cover. I remember after they made it and came back for their triumphant return the tickets were $6 each. Not realizing the scope of their popularity I thought that was outrageous and refused to pay it. I wish now I had since the last time I got to see the original Skynyrd was around 1971 or 1972. Enjoy the show.

Sam
davr35
Junior
Username: davr35

Post Number: 29
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, May 31, 2005 - 9:52 am:   Edit Post

I'd have to say the price of shows is just insane these days. My first show was Fleetwood Mac in 1980 and I paid $10.50 I saw the Stones in 81 and paid $18.50 and that was a hell of a lot for a show back then
tom_z
Intermediate Member
Username: tom_z

Post Number: 141
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Tuesday, May 31, 2005 - 10:18 am:   Edit Post

I agree that the prices of concert tickets has gotten pretty crazy. That is probably my least favorite thing about the concert scene. And I too, truly love LIVE music.

When I was in high school, my friends and I took advantage of as much live music as we could wrap our ears around in the Chicago area. We all had some kind of jobs and I don't remember the ticket prices being a huge issue, even for the big popular shows of the time. I really don't see how younger concert-goers are able to afford to go to top-tier events these days.

Fortunately, there are some rather fine bands making amazing music, and still playing smaller venues for less $$. This past Saturday, for example, I saw Global Funk, who played in a small bar here in Vegas for a donation of $5. What a hot show! Check them out if they are playing in a town near you - they're on a run through CA in early June. Which leads me to one of my favorite things about live music - that is - being blown away unexpectedly by really talented, relatively low-profile musicians. What a treat!

Tom
kmh364
Senior Member
Username: kmh364

Post Number: 885
Registered: 9-2003
Posted on Tuesday, May 31, 2005 - 10:21 am:   Edit Post

Two years ago, when Gary Rossington had his heart problems, tix (real seats, not GA) at a minor league hockey arena (Sovereign Bank, Trenton NJ) were about $40-$50each. Now they're at a big bar and it's over $70 bucks/ticket for GA! The Outlaws were just there last week (I was at the Velvet Revolver show at the PNC bank Arts Center..$70/Ticket, unfortunately)on their 30th anniversary tour for $25 (Marshall Tucker was $15)!!! I've never payed more than $35 at the same venue, and I've seen Tesla, Yngwie, Gov't Mule, etc. Skynyrd is really trying to cash-in, it seems. They had better be worth their weight in gold this time around for that kinda money or they can kiss my Yankee *ss for one more thin dime to see 'em, LOL!
richbass939
Advanced Member
Username: richbass939

Post Number: 277
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Tuesday, May 31, 2005 - 11:13 am:   Edit Post

I know I sound like an old man, talking about the old days but I especially remember 2 shows in 1974 or 1975, probably. U. of Houston Jeppeson Stadium, Allman Bros, Eagles, Commander Cody. Around the same time, Cotton Bowl in Dallas, Stones, Eagles, Montrose, and a local band warming up for them. I don't remember the ticket price but I would bet it wasn't more than $15 or $17. I'm glad I got to see some great acts when prices were low and I would actually go see them.
Rich
wideload
Member
Username: wideload

Post Number: 87
Registered: 6-2003
Posted on Tuesday, May 31, 2005 - 11:28 am:   Edit Post

I wonder if the need for higher ticket prices (expenses are up, entourages are up, liability is up, expectations of a spectacular show are up) leads to audiences who feel entitled to act however they please, since they paid such a high tariff? Doesn't make it right, just a thought. When pop acts put so much emphasis on the staging, dancing and costumes, then play a recording of the vocals, AND OUR KIDS PUT UP WITH IT, its truly a world gone mad!

Larry
kmh364
Senior Member
Username: kmh364

Post Number: 887
Registered: 9-2003
Posted on Tuesday, May 31, 2005 - 1:54 pm:   Edit Post

Nah, concertgoers have always been obnoxious: the price increase hasn't changed that. The fact that a bunch of us are now old farts and have lost the patience to deal with the morons is the difference, LOL! You'd have thought high tix prices would separate the wheat from the chaff, but it just ain't so. Obviously, morons have money too, LOL!
alembic76407
Advanced Member
Username: alembic76407

Post Number: 371
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Tuesday, May 31, 2005 - 2:38 pm:   Edit Post

Am I the only one thats get's bugged about the girl that's singing at the top of her lungs? I did not pay to hear her sing, or maybe I did !!!

I saw Bruce Springsteen in 1975 {when he still rocked} for $8.00, and they said if you didn't like the show you could get your money back.
I almost quit playing after seeing the E Street band, one of the best live shows I ever seen!!!

David T
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 480
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Tuesday, May 31, 2005 - 2:49 pm:   Edit Post

I'm sitting in my office looking at my framed poster from Bill Graham's first New Years Eve Show. Actually two nights, Friday, December 30th and Saturday, December 31st, 1966. The first night: Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane & Quicksilver Messenger Service - 9:00 p.m. - 2:00 a.m. - $2.50. New Years Eve: same 3 bands 9:00 p.m. - 9:00 a.m. with breakfast - $5.00! I also remember seeing the Dead at the Sound Check (official unveiling of the Wall of Sound) at the Cow Palace in San Francisco in March, 1974. $4.00 and they gave away a free mini 33 1/3 rpm record (4 songs) on the way out! Those were indeed the days. This Friday I'm going to Hot Tuna at the Fillmore, tickets paid for with American Express points. Times have changed.

Bill, tgo
davehouck
Moderator
Username: davehouck

Post Number: 1844
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Tuesday, May 31, 2005 - 5:02 pm:   Edit Post

A few weeks ago I went to see Jeff Coffin. Jeff's the sax player for Bela Fleck & the Flecktones. His touring band at that point included a guitar player and bass player that I was unfamiliar with. On some nights the drummer was Futureman from the Flecktones, but on this particular night Futureman played percussion and the drummer was Chester Thompson. The gig was part of an outdoor sports festival. The admission was free. I was sitting in the grass right in front of the stage and when people started dancing, I got up and stood beside the stage and watched Chester Thompson; for free. This was a group of very good musicians playing very good music in a venue where you could get up close and watch the interaction between the musicians; for free. You could tell the bass player was having a great time playing with Chester!
jacko
Advanced Member
Username: jacko

Post Number: 206
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Wednesday, June 01, 2005 - 1:32 am:   Edit Post

My first concert was Deep Purple in 1972 at Newcastle city hall. My oldest brother took me and I'm pretty sure the tickets were 90pence for second row seats (that's about $1.50 us). Also on the bill were Chicken Shack and a local band, the Junko partners. For 90pence!!!!! Crosby stills and nash are playing edinburgh this year - tickets are something like 45. I've decided to pass on this.
As for Rowdy fans, Everytime I've seen Yes in scotland - 6 times since 1998, - somebody has shouted drunken encouragement during the intro to 'And you and I'. That really P@sses me off.

graeme
88persuader
Intermediate Member
Username: 88persuader

Post Number: 134
Registered: 5-2004
Posted on Wednesday, June 01, 2005 - 2:00 am:   Edit Post

My 1st concert was Led Zeppelin at the Boston Gardens in the 70's. (I was 14 YO) My pal and I lucked into tickets outside the concert an hour before the show. Get this ... they were middle row floor level tickets for $7.50 each! Yep ... seven dollars and fifty cents to see Zep for their Stairway to Heaven tour. Some guys son had the tickets, couldn't go and the guy just wanted the ticket price for them. And they were the highest price tickets! $7.50, $5.50 and $4.50 for the nose bleed section. Since then I've been lucky because most shows I go to now are more progressive rock shows and it's hard to sing along to King Crimson! :-) Although i DID see girls dancing to Gentle Giant and if you've heard G.G. you'd know how hard that must have been! :-)
bracheen
Senior Member
Username: bracheen

Post Number: 732
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Wednesday, June 01, 2005 - 3:18 am:   Edit Post

David, the girl helping out Paul McCartney would for sure be annoying. That's one reason I don't go to a lot of events, not just concerts. People seem to have forgotten how to act in public. Granted, my tolerance level goes down as my age goes up. My last big show was Eric Clapton. My rant about that is here on the board somewhere.

Sam
grateful
Member
Username: grateful

Post Number: 77
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, June 01, 2005 - 3:44 am:   Edit Post

My first show was The Who in 69; I can't remember the price but it wasn't a lot. Even if the whole audience had sang along it would have been inaudible!!! It took 3 days for the ringing in my ears to stop. Those were the days!

Mark
keith_h
Member
Username: keith_h

Post Number: 83
Registered: 2-2005
Posted on Wednesday, June 01, 2005 - 4:46 am:   Edit Post

"Although i DID see girls dancing to Gentle Giant and if you've heard G.G. you'd know how hard that must have been! "

Reminds me of the time I saw Brand X at the Beginnings concert club outside Chicago. My friend and I were talking to a couple of girls at our table when one pipes up and asks "Can you dance to them?". :-)

Keith
kmh364
Senior Member
Username: kmh364

Post Number: 888
Registered: 9-2003
Posted on Wednesday, June 01, 2005 - 5:31 am:   Edit Post

No Dave, you're certainly not the only one pissed about the screaming mee-mee attempting to sing next to you at a show. Unfortunately, there's not much you can do about it except for getting aggravated in a vain attempt to get her to stop before you yourself start screaming or by leaving/not going to the show in the first place. In any case, you lose, unfortunately. As a man of INFINITE patience myself (clearing my throat here due to the thick, er, um, irony here, LOL!), I try to grin and bear it as I am there to have a good time, to relax, unwind, and certainly not get aggravated. I also try to respect others rights to a good time, and I expect the same in return from them. Sometimes it actually works out that way! It helps to go see acts that are "past" their prime, as the resulting crowd tends to be slightly more mellow, LOL!
davehouck
Moderator
Username: davehouck

Post Number: 1846
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Wednesday, June 01, 2005 - 7:42 am:   Edit Post

Just for fun, here's another perspective from which to consider the girl singing along with Paul; she may have been having the time of her life. The experience of the music that we anticipated has been diminished; but life is never exactly as we would like for it to be. Being disappointed that our experience is not what we had hoped is entirely understandable. But if we choose to let our disappointment rule the entire evening, then it is we who suffer as a consequence. But, in understanding and accepting the situation as it is, we have a chance to make something out of it. We can recognize the joy that the girl singing with Paul is experiencing; and we can be happy for her. And being happy for others is a lot more fun than just being disappointed.

But then I've never actually been to a Paul McCartney concert <g>
chuckc
New
Username: chuckc

Post Number: 10
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Wednesday, June 01, 2005 - 8:34 am:   Edit Post

Well guys as long as we're doing the time warp, my first serious concert was seeing The Who with a dapper JAE in a 3 piece Glen Plaid suit and Fender Jazz bass opening for Herman's Hermits. As I recall our 4th row seats were $ 4.50. The Blues Magoos opened the show and then the Who came on and just tore it up. The little teeny bopper girls were not quite sure what to make of Pete and Keith and were anxiously waiting for Herman. We left before Herman was finished with their first song. I believe this was The Who's first American tour that ended up at the Monteray Jazz Festival; 67 or 68 I guess. What a memory. Most of the concerts after that smacked of the usual execesses of too many drugs, booze or whatever but that was just me. :^)
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 482
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Wednesday, June 01, 2005 - 11:15 am:   Edit Post

At a lot of shows I've been to the volume has been so loud that even if someone were singing along next to me, I wouldn't have heard it anyway. There is an advantage to loud volume! More seriously, I've often found myself wanting to sing along, but in deference to those around me have stood there like a schmuck mouthing the words. I must admit that when the band invites the audience to sing along I've been known to let loose and belt it out. On a few of these occasions I've had other people around me compliment my singing. (Further proof that loud music scrambles the brain). Admittedly, that feels good.

Bill, tgo
sfnic
Member
Username: sfnic

Post Number: 64
Registered: 3-2005
Posted on Wednesday, June 01, 2005 - 4:19 pm:   Edit Post

If we're going to warp this conversation from "the first concert I've been to" to "the loudest" concert I've been to", I'd have to say it was The Pretenders an the Oakland Auditorium, sometime in the late '70s. For some reason, they had Ted Nugent's _outdoor_ rig (by TFA Electrosound) stuffed into a 3600 seat auditorium. They had The Clash's engineer mixing.

Now, I've been a sound engineer for <mumble> years, but that was the only time I actually experienced temporary deafness because the PA was so !@#$%^&* loud. I heard something that may have been "Good Evening, Oakland!" followed by a blast of what might have been a snare drum, then near-total silence except for a telephone ringer somewhare off in the distance.

Now, I had worked some incredibly loud gigs before (Joe Walsh, blowing up half the PA at Santa Barbara; the Who in Phoenix; and we won't even discuss ELP at the US festival...), but this was a first.

Scared the shit out of me, it did, seeing as I used my ears for my living, at the time. Pissed me off, too, as I really wanted to hear the concert.

I had regained enough hearing to be functional by the next morning, but the ringing didn't go away for almost two weeks. It took about 2 months until I could take a hearing test and get the basically same results I got before the exposure. (I never did get that last 2db at 22Hz back, dammit. Though my upper end stayed at 19.8k, same as always.)

I should never have taught those bozos at TFA how to wire speakers in-phase...

<grumpy>
richbass939
Advanced Member
Username: richbass939

Post Number: 281
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Wednesday, June 01, 2005 - 8:07 pm:   Edit Post

I know this thread isn't really about TV concerts but I just got through watching the Eagles' Farewell I tour on NBC. Timothy B. was playing an old J-bass. I don't know if he really plays Carvins when they're not taking pics for their catalog but I didn't see any onstage.
The guys' vocals seem to be aging very well. Joe Walsh had some white-on-black polka dot parachute pants on. He always was kind-of a different one. They sounded really good.
Rich
88persuader
Intermediate Member
Username: 88persuader

Post Number: 135
Registered: 5-2004
Posted on Wednesday, June 01, 2005 - 8:49 pm:   Edit Post

I saw some of the Eagles farewell show. They always sound very polished. As far as Carvin useage is concerned I believe Tim B. used them on the "Hell freezes over" tour and DVD. I remember seeing it some years ago on TV and I'm sure he used Carvins. Maybe he's pushing Fender now? And in regard to loud concerts ... a few years ago I saw a great tripple bill, Kings X, Joe S., and Dream Theater. I had great seats stage right but infront of the front end. The sound man did a great job but GOD was it loud!!! (At least where i was sitting) Kings X records with a lot of richness and bottom and it was there live too. Almost made my stomach sick! ;-) BUT they were awesome ... all three acts were!
88persuader
Intermediate Member
Username: 88persuader

Post Number: 136
Registered: 5-2004
Posted on Wednesday, June 01, 2005 - 8:57 pm:   Edit Post

Oh and to davehouck's point ... I agree you don't want to hurt someone's good time. BUTTTTTT if they're hurting YOUR good time and others around you I believe it's they who should be more considerate. I saw Hall and Oats last year and two women sitting right being me TALKED LOUDLY over the whole show. Everyone in my area was pissed off at these two ADULT women holding a conversation (yelling) over each song. If they didn't like the song the talked and if they did they talked about how much they liked the song! I can tell you there were at least 8 adults ready to kill them. Now is that fair?? I think not! So i guess in regards to singing to the band ... my opinion is people in public should be kind to their neighbors ... regardless how they feel. The girl singing may have been having the time of her life ... but at others expense.
dela217
Senior Member
Username: dela217

Post Number: 514
Registered: 6-2002
Posted on Thursday, June 02, 2005 - 11:19 am:   Edit Post

On the loud concert subject..... I would say the loudest show I have been to is Stanley Clarke!!! It was a small music club. Not that the PA was terribly loud, but the level coming off the stage was louder than the mains. It was painful. I went to check out his Alembic, but ended up leaving after 3 or 4 songs. TOO LOUD!

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