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flaxattack
Senior Member
Username: flaxattack

Post Number: 1348
Registered: 4-2004
Posted on Thursday, January 04, 2007 - 7:02 pm:   Edit Post

Nassau police Wednesday arrested a Westbury man on charges of trying to deliver marijuana in a bakery box to a correctional facility on Christmas Eve.

Rocco Bove, 24, was nabbed for the failed holiday delivery Wednesday morning.

He was charged with three counts of first-degree promoting prison contraband and two counts of second-degree promoting prison contraband. He was also charged with unlawful possession of marijuana.
Police accused Bove of packaging pot -- stuffed in a zip-lock bag -- rolling papers, matches and a flint pad into a bakery box, and attempting to deliver the marijuana to an inmate at Nassau County Correctional Center in East Meadow.

After correction officers seized the box and a county lab confirmed is was marijuana, Bove was arrested at his home. He could not be reached for comment.

comment was - like wow what was i thinkin?
flaxattack
Senior Member
Username: flaxattack

Post Number: 1349
Registered: 4-2004
Posted on Thursday, January 04, 2007 - 7:10 pm:   Edit Post

IT GETS BETTER!!!!!
Holy cannoli!

Nassau police said Thursday that they disrupted a special delivery at the county jail in East Meadow, when a correction officer was arrested and charged with trying to deliver marijuana in a box of cannolis.




Rocco Bove, 24, of Westbury, was arrested Wednesday in the failed Dec. 24 delivery. He was charged with five counts of first- and second-degree promoting prison contraband and unlawful possession of marijuana. He pleaded not guilty Thursday at First District Court in Hempstead and faces up to 1 1/3 to 4 years in prison if convicted.

Police accused Bove of packaging pot -- stuffed in a plastic bag -- rolling papers, matches and a flint pad into a bakery box. He tried to deliver the marijuana to an inmate at the jail, police said.

The 1-foot by 1-foot, 6-inch-high box contained less than a half-gram of marijuana and the other materials, hidden in six cannolis.

"This guy didn't think he was going to get caught," said Det. Lt. Raymond Cote, commanding officer of the Third Squad. He said Bove has no criminal record.

When correction officers seized the box after a routine search and a county lab confirmed that it was marijuana, Bove was arrested at his home. He could not be reached for comment.

Bove, an employee since April 2005, has been suspended without pay since Christmas Eve, said Lt. Michael Golio of the sheriff's office.

Never mind the marijuana; Golio said officers can't give cannolis to inmates, either.

"Corrections are not permitted to bring items in for inmates who are in custody," Golio said. "That's a violation of our rules, and obviously, if ... it's contraband, it rises to a crime."

Golio said the jail is always on the lookout for contraband.

"Any time we discover it, we take whatever action is appropriate," Golio said. "It requires vigilance."
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 1960
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Thursday, January 04, 2007 - 7:45 pm:   Edit Post

Tell the guy to plead "NGS"

Not Guilty by reason of Stupidity!

And who in their right mind is going to eat a gift cannoli? Didn't everyone see Godfather Part III?

Bill, tgo
made_a_rose
Junior
Username: made_a_rose

Post Number: 14
Registered: 5-2006
Posted on Thursday, January 04, 2007 - 8:21 pm:   Edit Post

Leave the Gun....

Take the Cannoli.


I thought I smelled something cooking!
inthelows
Advanced Member
Username: inthelows

Post Number: 262
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Thursday, January 04, 2007 - 10:03 pm:   Edit Post

The only thing cooking is the guys brain.
NLP
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 1961
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Thursday, January 04, 2007 - 10:54 pm:   Edit Post

"The 1-foot by 1-foot, 6-inch-high box contained less than a half-gram of marijuana and the other materials, hidden in six cannolis."

Something smells fishy. Less than 1/2 gram is enough to role a single skinny joint. It doesn't make sense that someone would go to all this trouble for such a small amount of weed. Either the report is wrong (media being less than 100% accurate? nahhhhh!!!!!) or some of this cannabis disappeared somewhere along the way. Either way, it really is ridiculous that all this fuss is made over a little dried plant that is less dangerous than the cannolis. (And if you don't believe me, just ask Don Altobello).

Bill, tgo
cozmik_cowboy
Member
Username: cozmik_cowboy

Post Number: 63
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 5:52 am:   Edit Post

"This guy didn't think he was going to get caught,"
OK, I'm going to venture that Lt. Cote is dumber than Officer Bove. Who the &%*# commits a crime if they do think they're to get caught? And props to Bove for being considerate enough to include munchies with the weed! (In a Homer Simpson voice: Pot and canollis....MMMMMM!)

Peter
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 1963
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 7:23 am:   Edit Post

You are absolutely right, Peter. In 20 years of practicing criminal defense, I have never met a single person who committed the offense thinking "I'm going to get caught". EVERYONE thinks THEY won't get caught. This is why the idea of "deterrence" as a foundation for our criminal justice system is a huge fallacy. We just keep jacking up the sentences, putting people in cages for longer and longer periods of time and it still has no deterrent effect. To me, it makes as much sense as attempting to cure cancer by passing a law that anyone who gets cancer goes to prison for 15 years. The U.S.A. has 5% of the world's population, and 25% of the world's prison population. We're number one when it comes to percentage of population behind bars or under control of the criminal justice system (parole and probation), and number two is so far behind it is a mere speck on the horizon. And we still call ourselves "The Land of the Free". Talk is cheap.

Bill, tgo
cozmik_cowboy
Member
Username: cozmik_cowboy

Post Number: 64
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 7:58 am:   Edit Post

I once heard the sheriff of Will County, IL, say (and I quote) "The marajuana today is 1000 times more powerful and deadly than it was in the sixties."
First; 1000X? That sounds like George Carlin's "no toke sh*t" - leave it in the closet and stay high just knowing it's there. While I admittedly do not search with anywhere near the frequency I once did, I have yet to find this stuff.
Second; deadly?!?!? You would seem to have your finger on the pulse of this sort of thing, Bill - have I somehow missed the news of the massive epidemic of reefer overdose deaths?
In the immortal words of B. Bunny, "What a maroon."

Peter
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 1964
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 8:20 am:   Edit Post

It is true that there is more high quality cannabis available today than in the 60's, but not anywhere near 1000% stronger. This argument is, however a red herring. Smoking cannabis results in a very rapid onset of effect - usually 2-3 minutes maximum. Thus the smoker can very effectively titrate the dosage. As a result, people smoke less if the cannabis is stronger, and more if it is less potent. Think of alcohol. In high school if I drank it was usually beer. We'd even drink warm beer through straws bcause someone said you get drunker that way! Now, if I drink at all, I'm more apt to have a scotch or a martini or Gibson. This alcohol is far stronger than the beer of my youth. Guess what? I don't pour 12 ounces of scotch into a glass and chug it.

As for toxicity, in the entire recorded history of mankind, not a single person has ever died from a cannabis overdose. (And consider that 1100-1500 people in the U.S.A. die each year from aspirin poisoning). I have seen some research that suggests a person would need to smoke a joint the size of a telephone pole in 15 minutes to induce a fatal reaction.

Another talking point being circulated by the gov't is that cannabis is now the number one reason for teens seeking medical/rehab treatment. What is left unsaid is that this is not because teens are checking themselves into Betty Ford, but rather it is a result of courts ordering teens to rehab - whether they need it or not. IMHO a 17 year old who gets caught with a few joints on the way to a Widespread Panic concert probably doesn't really need rehab.

Bill, tgo
bsee
Senior Member
Username: bsee

Post Number: 1435
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 8:53 am:   Edit Post

Relative to "deterrence", the issue is not so much the length of the sentence, but the likelihood of capture and successful prosecution. Would you be more likely to commit a crime with a 75% chance of one year in prison, or a 10% chance of ten years? Which would be the more fair? Once you get the capture/conviction rates up to better than a 50/50 shot, I think you can further manage it through stiffness of penalty. Until then, it would take an extraordinarily harsh penalty to cut crime, which is probably why there are so many jail sentences on the books for posession rather than simple small fines.
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 1965
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 9:33 am:   Edit Post

If the cops weren't spending so much time and $ going after drugs and drug-related crime, there would be a substantial increase in the percentage of crimes solved. About 75% of those incarcerated are there for drugs or drug-related activity. If you regulated drugs, the crime rate in this country would drop at least 50% overnight. And it would make it much more difficult for a kid to get drugs. Today, a 14 year old can get pot a lot easier than they can get a bottle of Jack Daniels. Sell cannabis in licensed stores, take the huge black market profits out of it, tax it, require I.D. to purchase, and far less will be available to kids.

Bill, tgo
cozmik_cowboy
Member
Username: cozmik_cowboy

Post Number: 65
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 9:49 am:   Edit Post

But isn't it a quarter of a century now since Ronnie Raygun ramped up the "war on drugs"? Surely by now there are no drugs left, right?
One definition of insanity that I've seen is "repeating the same action and expecting different results." To paraphrase Pete Seeger, when will they ever learn? (I suspect the answer is whenever pharmacutical companies figure how to patent pot).

Peter
davehouck
Moderator
Username: davehouck

Post Number: 4678
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 6:47 pm:   Edit Post

Bill said "titrate".

Titrate???

Titrate: To determine the concentration of (a solution) by titration or perform the operation of titration.

Titration: The process, operation, or method of determining the concentration of a substance in solution by adding to it a standard reagent of known concentration in carefully measured amounts until a reaction of definite and known proportion is completed, as shown by a color change or by electrical measurement, and then calculating the unknown concentration.


Ok.

Don't titrate that joint, my friend ...
dannobasso
Senior Member
Username: dannobasso

Post Number: 435
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 7:43 pm:   Edit Post

Here is a list of the things you can try with children and impaired adults who process life differently.
Keep all your speech simple - to a level they understand.
Keep instructions simple ... for complicated jobs use lists or pictures.
Try to get confirmation that they understand what you are talking about/or asking - don't rely on a stock yes or no - that they like to answer with.
Explain why they should look at you when you speak to them.... encourage them, give lots of praise for any achievement - especially when they use a social skill without prompting.
In some young children who appear not to listen - the act of 'singing' your words can have a beneficial effect.
Limit any choices to two or three items.
Limit their 'special interest' time to set amounts of time each day if you can.
Use turn taking activities as much as possible, not only in games but at home too.
Warn them of any changes, and give warning prompts if you want them to finish a task... 'when you have colored that in we are going shopping'.
Try to build in some flexibility in their routine, if they learn early that things do change and often without warning - it can help.
Don't always expect them to 'act their age' they are usually immature and you should make some allowances for this.
Try to identify stress triggers - avoid them if possible -be ready to distract with some alternative 'come and see this...' etc.
Find a way of coping with behavior problems - perhaps trying to ignore it if it's not too bad or hugging sometimes can help.
Promises and threats you make will have to be kept - so try not to make them too lightly.
Teach them some strategies for coping - telling people who are teasing perhaps to 'go away' or to breathe deeply and count to 20 if they feel the urge to cry in public.
Begin early to teach the difference between private and public places and actions, so that they can develop ways of coping with more complex social rules later in life.
Let them know that you love them - wart's an' all' - and that you are proud of them.

(Message edited by dannobasso on January 05, 2007)
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 1968
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 8:17 pm:   Edit Post

Dave:

Here's a link to a comment by Dr. Lester Grinspoon, retired professor of psychiatry at Harvard, (and arguably the world's foremost expert on medical cannabis), in which he talks about titration as it relates to the ingestion of medicine (cannabis) to achieve the desired result.

http://72.14.253.104/search?q=cache:Y4Km3LcLrHAJ:www.maps.org/mmj/grinspoon012704.html+lester+grinspoon+cannabis+self+titration&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=1

Bill, tgo

(Message edited by lbpesq on January 05, 2007)
bob
Senior Member
Username: bob

Post Number: 798
Registered: 11-2002
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 9:47 pm:   Edit Post

(danno - that was a great list, thanks for posting it. please keep up the good work.)
davehouck
Moderator
Username: davehouck

Post Number: 4681
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Sunday, January 07, 2007 - 5:34 pm:   Edit Post

Thanks Bill; I like learning new words, even if it's unlikely I'll be able to remember them.

No officer, those are titration papers.

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