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cozmik_cowboy
Senior Member
Username: cozmik_cowboy

Post Number: 524
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Friday, July 31, 2009 - 2:46 pm:   Edit Post

Elijah Wald, How The Beatles Destroyed Rock N Roll: An Alternative History Of American Popular Music. Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, 2009.

A very interesting and fresh take on the development of American music from ~1899 to now. I liked it so much that I just started his Escaping The Delta: Robert Johnson And The Invention Of The Blues - promises to be worth the read as well.

Peter
elwoodblue
Senior Member
Username: elwoodblue

Post Number: 776
Registered: 6-2002
Posted on Friday, July 31, 2009 - 4:14 pm:   Edit Post

Thanks Peter,
both sound very interesting. A few years back I read the book 'Blues fell this morning' by Paul Oliver that was pretty good.
davehouck
Moderator
Username: davehouck

Post Number: 8478
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Friday, July 31, 2009 - 6:00 pm:   Edit Post

Thanks for the review Peter; I'm reading through the reviews now. It sounds like the kind of thing I would be very interested in; though I may wait awhile for the paperback and for the price to come down.
jacko
Senior Member
Username: jacko

Post Number: 2355
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Monday, August 03, 2009 - 4:01 am:   Edit Post

Order it from your public library Dave. Even cheaper ;-)

Graeme
davehouck
Moderator
Username: davehouck

Post Number: 8486
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Monday, August 03, 2009 - 3:00 pm:   Edit Post

Good idea Graeme!
svlilioukalani
Member
Username: svlilioukalani

Post Number: 64
Registered: 6-2008
Posted on Tuesday, August 04, 2009 - 2:38 am:   Edit Post

Good Idea. I just reserved the book at my local public library. It must be good, there are 32 people in front of me on the list.

While we are on the subject of good books. I highly recommend the book. The music lesson : a spiritual search for growth through music / Victor L. Wooten.

It may be too touchy feely for the less feeling members of our community. This is a very Buddhist approach to music. But, I have never heard a discussion about the notes you don't play, space in phrasing, or feeling the music with your entire body not just you ears. Victor's approach is so radical he had to put in the form of a fiction novel.
jacko
Senior Member
Username: jacko

Post Number: 2359
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Tuesday, August 04, 2009 - 3:36 am:   Edit Post

I'll second "the Music Lesson". A fine read that gave me several areas to think about.

Graeme
jerryme
Intermediate Member
Username: jerryme

Post Number: 124
Registered: 1-2008
Posted on Tuesday, August 04, 2009 - 8:38 am:   Edit Post

The Horn Player, by John Chellon Holmes.

It was Jerry's favorite book.

Colin
benson_murrensun
Intermediate Member
Username: benson_murrensun

Post Number: 158
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Tuesday, August 04, 2009 - 9:31 am:   Edit Post

The Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers. All volumes.
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 4027
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Tuesday, August 04, 2009 - 11:39 am:   Edit Post

I just finished "Shakey", Neil Young's biography. Excellent read.

Bill, tgo
cozmik_cowboy
Senior Member
Username: cozmik_cowboy

Post Number: 526
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Tuesday, August 04, 2009 - 2:11 pm:   Edit Post

How many volumes are there now, Ben? I've got the first 7, but haven't looked for more in a loooong time. And I'm 4 chapters into Escaping The Delta and will now go ahead & recommend it as well.
Bill - who's the author? Or is it auto?

Peter
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 4028
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Tuesday, August 04, 2009 - 5:11 pm:   Edit Post

Shakey was written by Jimmy McDonough who apparently spent several years in Young's inner circle. Young contributed quite a bit to the book which includes a running dialog between Young and the author.

Bill, tgo
jacko
Senior Member
Username: jacko

Post Number: 2361
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Wednesday, August 05, 2009 - 12:50 am:   Edit Post

"Shakey" was one of my birthday books and is sitting on the shelf waiting for me to finish Clapton's autobiography. I also got "The Beatles: the authorised biography" by Hunter Davies and matt Rendell's "The death of Marco Pantani" so I have an interesting month or so ahead.

Graeme
jerryme
Intermediate Member
Username: jerryme

Post Number: 125
Registered: 1-2008
Posted on Wednesday, August 05, 2009 - 6:40 am:   Edit Post

Miles Davis' autobiography is awsome too....

Home before Daylight- Steve Parish's (roadie and personal manager for Jerry Garcia)autobiography is really good too.
jx2638
Junior
Username: jx2638

Post Number: 40
Registered: 2-2008
Posted on Wednesday, August 05, 2009 - 8:22 am:   Edit Post

Colin,
I just read the Steve Parish book (among others) on a cross-country drive filled with hours of GD Radio on XM...a nice combo. I was left feeling very sad...it's been tough to shake it given the time of year, etc.
I have McNally's book and the Slash autobiography queued up and ready to go...the Van Halen biog was great too.
jerryme
Intermediate Member
Username: jerryme

Post Number: 126
Registered: 1-2008
Posted on Wednesday, August 05, 2009 - 11:00 am:   Edit Post

Sometimes can't tell much difference between the dark and the light...

McNally's book is great, but the best by far is Blair Jackson's Garcia: An American Life in terms of the Garcia biographies.
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 4031
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Wednesday, August 05, 2009 - 12:57 pm:   Edit Post

I found McNally's book to be the best biography. Blair Jackson's Grateful Dead Gear book is also excellent. The best Dead book, IMHO, is Phil's autobiography: Searching for the Sound.

Bill, tgo
tom_z
Senior Member
Username: tom_z

Post Number: 585
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Wednesday, August 05, 2009 - 12:58 pm:   Edit Post

Since we're throwing in other titles, here are a couple good ones to consider:

The Real Frank Zappa - very entertaining autobiography

Chronicles, Volume 1 by Bob Dylan
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 4033
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Wednesday, August 05, 2009 - 2:21 pm:   Edit Post

"This Wheel's on Fire" by Levon Helm. Best book on the Band. "Across the Great Divide: The Band and America" is pretty good too.

Bill, tgo
jacko
Senior Member
Username: jacko

Post Number: 2362
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Thursday, August 06, 2009 - 1:23 am:   Edit Post

I'll second Phil's book as a great GD read. (I was quick enough with the pre-order to get the signed frontispiece too) and McNally's book gives a superb picture of the life of the band as a whole. The only criticism I have of Blair jackson's Grateful Dead gear book is that it perpetuates the myth that Irwin was the only one to have a hand in building 'Wolf'. Shows a certain lack of research.

For a truly astounding autobiography I'd recommend Charles Mingus' "Beneath the Underdog" although I would caution that it's not for the straitlaced.

Graeme

p.s. having read and enjoyed fear and Loathing several times, I finally saw (some of) the movie last night. Boy was it dull.
jx2638
Junior
Username: jx2638

Post Number: 42
Registered: 2-2008
Posted on Thursday, August 06, 2009 - 10:36 am:   Edit Post

Does gear book give much depth to Wall Of Sound?

And does Phil's book chronicle the band's history similar to the Parish and McNally books??
jack
Advanced Member
Username: jack

Post Number: 219
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Thursday, August 06, 2009 - 11:46 am:   Edit Post

For something completely different, try "Dirt" about/by Motley Crue. I am no fan of their music, but someone gave me this book and it was very interesting. Graphic at times, but also very sensitive and even gutwrenching at others. And suprisingly well written. A good look into the 80s rock/metal scene.

Also, who's read the Eric Clapton autobio? It's gotten some rave reviews, I haven't looked at it yet though.

And I'm sure many have read "Standing in the Shadows of Motown." That's another one I need to get to.
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 4035
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Thursday, August 06, 2009 - 11:52 am:   Edit Post

Clapton's book is excellent. Also, "Clapton's Guitar" by Allen St. John about renowned luthier & player Wayne Henderson is wonderful.

Bill, tgo
afrobeat_fool
Junior
Username: afrobeat_fool

Post Number: 38
Registered: 7-2009
Posted on Thursday, August 06, 2009 - 11:54 am:   Edit Post

I read the Clapton auto-bio and found it very dry. There is some insight into his life but suprisingly little that isn't already well documented. The McNally book looks interesting.
sonicus
Advanced Member
Username: sonicus

Post Number: 221
Registered: 5-2009
Posted on Thursday, August 06, 2009 - 11:54 am:   Edit Post

JACO by Bill Milkowski

The extraordinary and tragic life of Jaco Pastorius
"The world's greatest bass player"
sonicus
Advanced Member
Username: sonicus

Post Number: 222
Registered: 5-2009
Posted on Thursday, August 06, 2009 - 12:02 pm:   Edit Post

THESAURUS OF SCALES AND MELODIC PATTERNS

By Nicolas Slonimsky

I think both John Coltrane and Jaco Pastorius like to study from this book ! And others I am sure.
jacko
Senior Member
Username: jacko

Post Number: 2363
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Friday, August 07, 2009 - 1:44 am:   Edit Post

Jae. The dead gear book goes into alot of depth about all of their kit. I think there's a chapter devoted to the wall of sound and there are many photos and diagrams of the stage layout in it's various incarnations.
Phil's book is similar to Parish's in that it's a very personal view of his time with the GD. There's also quite a bit about what's happened in his life since (aswell as his birth and early years). There's a very poignant chapter dealing with his fathers death and how 'Box of Rain' came to mean so much to him.

Graeme
jx2638
Junior
Username: jx2638

Post Number: 44
Registered: 2-2008
Posted on Friday, August 07, 2009 - 8:07 am:   Edit Post

Thanks Graeme. Based on that review I'll probably get them both.
benson_murrensun
Intermediate Member
Username: benson_murrensun

Post Number: 161
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Monday, August 10, 2009 - 11:12 am:   Edit Post

Peter,
I have to admit I don't know how many volumes of Freak Bros. there are... Back in the day I had the first 5 of them. Then someone "borrowed" them from me... and I never got them back. After that I heard that the publisher's space burned down. Then I heard that they were being reissued. But they seem to stand the test of time, sorta like Cheech and Chong.
cozmik_cowboy
Senior Member
Username: cozmik_cowboy

Post Number: 535
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Monday, August 10, 2009 - 2:24 pm:   Edit Post

With a little research (sounds more impressive than "a Google search") I have discovered that there are 13; you can get all of them, or all plus some in one volume, here. We've got some catching up to do!

Peter, who also has the first 2 issues of Junkwaffel (speaking of intities named Cheech)
hodge
Junior
Username: hodge

Post Number: 31
Registered: 11-2002
Posted on Wednesday, August 12, 2009 - 7:56 am:   Edit Post

i have the thesaurus of scales and melodic patterns, its the most expensive door stop i own
hodge
Junior
Username: hodge

Post Number: 32
Registered: 11-2002
Posted on Wednesday, August 12, 2009 - 8:02 am:   Edit Post

i also have a copy of the thesaurus of scales and melodic patterns. its the most expensive door stop i ever bought.
sonicus
Advanced Member
Username: sonicus

Post Number: 236
Registered: 5-2009
Posted on Wednesday, August 12, 2009 - 8:07 am:   Edit Post

It is easy to understand why some one would consider it's content
quite intimidating.
afrobeat_fool
Junior
Username: afrobeat_fool

Post Number: 50
Registered: 7-2009
Posted on Wednesday, August 12, 2009 - 3:14 pm:   Edit Post

The improvisor's Bass method, by Chuck Sher is the most valuable book I have ever studied. Plus it has transcriptions by Paul Jackson, Jaco, Mingus, Ron Carter, Jamerson..... There is alot of great material, well explained, and usable by all skill levels, upright and electric. And then there is the Simandal book. All classical bass students know this one and groan. Piston's book of Harmony is the one my mom gave me, with Paul Des Marais accompaning workbook.
hifiguy
Intermediate Member
Username: hifiguy

Post Number: 187
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Wednesday, August 12, 2009 - 3:48 pm:   Edit Post

Phil's book is excellent; read it a few weeks ago. Also good is "Garcia: An American Life."

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