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funkyjazzjunky
Senior Member
Username: funkyjazzjunky

Post Number: 562
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 6:52 am:   Edit Post

I was listening to satellite radio and heard a great song by (something about trucking) by the Grateful Dead. The only other tune I know of theirs is a tune I used to see on MTV in the 80ís that did not impress me.

Who can recommend some tunes as a good way to be introduced to their essence? I am not concerned about the greatest hits as much as the best material.
tubeperson
Member
Username: tubeperson

Post Number: 88
Registered: 5-2005
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 6:57 am:   Edit Post

The essence of the Dead is to listen to all of their material, which takes a lifetime. They are renowed as a jam band, check out the serises known as Dick's picks - bootlegs that band did not object to. Keep truckin' even with a touch of grey!!!

BTW all rock jam bandsowe the Dead for their influence.
sonicus
Senior Member
Username: sonicus

Post Number: 873
Registered: 5-2009
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 7:01 am:   Edit Post

The first "Live Dead" / "Working Man's Dead " /" American Beauty " These Albums are required in my music appreciation class as" home work listening" . I hope you enjoy them !

Sonic Regards ____________________
sonicus
Senior Member
Username: sonicus

Post Number: 874
Registered: 5-2009
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 7:19 am:   Edit Post

You can check out;
http://www.archive.org/details/GratefulDead

http://www.wolfgangsvault.com/grateful-dead/

I hope you love it like I do .
12stringwilson
Member
Username: 12stringwilson

Post Number: 78
Registered: 12-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 7:20 am:   Edit Post

"Terrapin Station" and "Reckoning" are two I have come back to lately. But Steve is absolutely correct...the Dead's live sets (Dick's Picks in particular) are a gem for the ears and mind. Enjoy and give us some feedback/thoughts/perceptions after listening.
grok
Junior
Username: grok

Post Number: 45
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 7:53 am:   Edit Post

I've been enjoying the Dead for about 40 years now, and I agree that Dick's Picks are a good way to get the real flavor for what they were about. The problem, though, is that you sort of need to now *how* to listen to the Dead before you can really see the magic. Yes, you can enjoy the tunes, but it's sort of like classical music -- knowing a bit more about it really helps to understand what's going on. In many ways, great Dead jams are sometimes like classical music in that a theme may start early on, while the music slowly changes into a variety of different arrangements, sometimes with the theme present in an understated way, and then returning to the theme. Or morphing into something completely different, but in a smooth, uninterrupted, and often unintentional way that still somehow seems to be exactly "right". These jams can go anywhere -- they were unscripted. So you could say it was less classical-like and more like the jazz of coltrane and davis, where thematic bits get rejumbled and mixed as the bandmembers lead each other down different paths culminating in all of them bringing things together. Of course, this is just my take on the thing.

My point is only that to really appreciate this stuff, starting in with a deep jam from say a '74 Dick's Pick's may not be the most readily approachable way to get into it. Or LiveDead, from early '69 -- a true classic but again perhaps not the most approachable if you've never listened to them before. Instead, I'd recommend something like Europe '72 for its mix of easily picked up songs like Mr. Charlie, Tennessee Jed, Brown Eyed Women, and Sugar Magnolia, along with some sweet jammin out of Truckin which really shows the meandering among the musicians quite well. Not to mention the glorious China Cat > Rider and a magnificent Morning Dew. A lot of great material on this one, easily approached and easily appreciated. Or perhaps Skullfuck from early '71, with Bertha, Not Fade Away > Goin Down the Road, and a monstrous Other One with Phil's bass thundering. (Funny, much of that album comes from the Fillmore East run in April '71, and that Other One was recorded 39 years ago tomorrow -- yikes, I feel old). Then when you've caught the bug, start in with the Dick's Picks. Or check out the community on etree or others -- I used to trade a lot of tapes, but now I've got brilliant recordings essentially complete for every show from '67-77, then selected shows from other years.

Again, just my own ramblings on the subject.

Mark

(Message edited by grok on April 27, 2010)

(Message edited by grok on April 27, 2010)
tubeperson
Member
Username: tubeperson

Post Number: 89
Registered: 5-2005
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 8:09 am:   Edit Post

Mark makes very valid points, I think it would be fascinating to see how different journeys of listening influence what we ultimately prefer. An analogy would be James Bond. Your favorite one tends to be the first one you saw play the role. Fans of the original run of Dr. Who episodes have expereinced this as well. Europe 72 is a fine album, but some of what makes the Dead so great is their willingness to allow the release of weaker performances. Fans of jazz improvization accept this (not willingly of course but we are all human (Even the creator had a flood!).

What is so awesome about this forum is the diversity of expereinces and opinions that we can all grow from. One of my teachers in improv (when I was a lad of course) stressed it was just as important to be aware of how to play what we do not like, just so we can either avoid it or figure out a way to alter it to meet our own tastes and then enjoy it. Keep up the positive dialogue it is a great learning base for all of us!!!
jbybj
Advanced Member
Username: jbybj

Post Number: 285
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 8:48 am:   Edit Post

This comes from someone who is most definitely not a Dead head, but none the less still enjoys some of their "more accesible" material.

I would recommend "Workingman's Dead" for a studio offering.
hydrargyrum
Senior Member
Username: hydrargyrum

Post Number: 786
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 9:45 am:   Edit Post

Working Man's Dead and American Beauty get my vote also. They're great albums, and much more accessible than thousands of hours of live shows (although previous posters are correct, the live material really is the essence of the Dead).
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 4393
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 10:49 am:   Edit Post

I agree with Wolf and others above that Live Dead, Workingman's Dead, and American Beauty are a good place to plug in for first timers and newbies. Another I'd add to the list of more accessible Dead material is Europe '72. A nice combo of "songs" and "jams". Bottom line: There was nothing like a Grateful Dead concert, or, as Bill Graham painted on the side of Winterland after it closed: "They're not the best at what they do, they're the only ones who do what they do"

Bill, tgo
benson_murrensun
Advanced Member
Username: benson_murrensun

Post Number: 258
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 11:22 am:   Edit Post

I love Jack Straw (from Europe '72)! Both Jerry Garcia and Bob Weir have alternating vocal parts. Weir describes the tune as sort of a novella. It's the bee's knees.
hydrargyrum
Senior Member
Username: hydrargyrum

Post Number: 787
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 11:29 am:   Edit Post

Good call Bill. Europe '72 is also a great album. I have a special fondness for that version of Me and My Uncle. My own uncle was a scoundrel, and ran afoul of the law many times. He didn't "leave" me any gold though.
flaxattack
Senior Member
Username: flaxattack

Post Number: 2366
Registered: 4-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 12:57 pm:   Edit Post

me and my uncle isnt on europe 72 its on the the skullf--- album which was one i was going to throw into the hopper.

i would also highly recommend dozin at the knick cd's. brents blow away will blow you away.
also the terrapin live cd from phils birthday show is a nice intro cd. imho
cozmik_cowboy
Senior Member
Username: cozmik_cowboy

Post Number: 692
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 2:02 pm:   Edit Post

My 1st Dead LP was Live/Dead, my 2nd was Workingman's Dead; it worked for me. To recommend a starting place for you, I'd rather know more about your tastes/interests (wild jamming vs. exquiste songs, etc.), but I have no qualms saying whatever you do, DO NOT start with either Steal Your Face or Shakedown Street! But do go into it knowing there really isn't a musical form you won't hear influences of somewhere in their stuff, and that the most apt description I've ever heard is Micky Hart's: using a rock lexicon with a jazz syntax.
BTW, Steve, I first saw John Pertwee as the Doctor, but prefer Tom Baker by far - though I will go to my grave insisting that Connery is the only Bond.
Also, I feel I should add that I don't have a problem with Vince per se - there are times when nothing but "Don't Touch Me There" will do. I just didn't think he fit well with the Dead.
(edit: Oops - I just realized that last sentence was written with another thread in mind. Oh, well, like a t-shirt I saw on a high school kid yesterday said, "I'm right 97% of the time. Who cares about the other 4%?")

Peter

(Message edited by cozmik_cowboy on April 28, 2010)
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 4394
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 5:58 pm:   Edit Post

Peter:

I've never heard that particular Mickey Hart description before, but for years I've been describing the Dead's thing as a jazz approach using rock 'n roll tools. I guess great minds think alike. (or maybe it's that twisted minds think alike!) lol

Bill, tgo
davehouck
Moderator
Username: davehouck

Post Number: 9261
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 6:47 pm:   Edit Post

Since Vann-Di has a jazz background, I'm thinking he might like "Help On the Way/Slipknot" off Blues For Allah, and "Estimated Prophet" off Terrapin Station. Both have great bass lines; and both feature complex ensemble playing.
davehouck
Moderator
Username: davehouck

Post Number: 9262
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 7:07 pm:   Edit Post

From 1998 to 2001 a group called Jazz Is Dead put out three albums that I think make a great introduction to Grateful Dead music for people coming from a jazz background. The first album featured Billy Cobham on drums, Alphonso Johnson on bass, T Lavitz on keyboards, and Jimmy Herring on guitar. On the second album the drum seat was split between Rod Morgenstein and Jeff Sipe. And on the third it's Morgenstein again on drums. All three albums are instrumental covers of Grateful Dead tunes; and all three feature great playing all the way through. Hearing these guys play these tunes really highlights the great songwriting of the Grateful Dead. I highly recommend them.
lembic76450
Advanced Member
Username: lembic76450

Post Number: 222
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 7:11 pm:   Edit Post

With that in mind Dave, he might have an interest in "Unbroken Chain" and "Weather Report Suite", and even "Eyes of the World".
davehouck
Moderator
Username: davehouck

Post Number: 9263
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 7:23 pm:   Edit Post

Agreed; especially with regards to Unbroken Chain, an absolutely beautiful tune.
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 4395
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 8:42 pm:   Edit Post

Another very enjoyable jazz take on Dead tunes is "Dark Star: The Music of the Grateful Dead" by the Dave Murray Octet.

Bill, tgo
afrobeat_fool
Intermediate Member
Username: afrobeat_fool

Post Number: 195
Registered: 7-2009
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 9:18 pm:   Edit Post

Was Alphonso playing an Alembic on these, Dave?
crobbins
Senior Member
Username: crobbins

Post Number: 589
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 9:51 pm:   Edit Post

crobbins
Senior Member
Username: crobbins

Post Number: 590
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 9:58 pm:   Edit Post

crobbins
Senior Member
Username: crobbins

Post Number: 591
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 10:02 pm:   Edit Post

Both of those pics are from my 1st Grateful Dead show.

07-21-74 Hollywood Bowl, Hollywood, Ca. (Sun)
1: Promised, Tennessee Jed, Me & My Uncle, Sugaree, Jack Straw, Half Step> Roses, El Paso, Scarlet, Around 1.5: Phil & Ned
2: China Cat> I Know You Rider, Big River, Row Jimmy, Playin> Wharf Rat> Truckin> Nobody's Jam> Playin, Ship Of Fools, Sugar Magnolia E: U. S. Blues
Commander Cody; Maria Muldaur with John Kahn opened
crobbins
Senior Member
Username: crobbins

Post Number: 592
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 10:12 pm:   Edit Post

kmh364
Senior Member
Username: kmh364

Post Number: 2285
Registered: 9-2003
Posted on Wednesday, April 28, 2010 - 3:43 am:   Edit Post

As a "relative" late-bloomer Dead Head, "Terrapin Station" and "Skull 'n Roses (aka SkullF**k)" turned me on to the Dead in '77 (Kudos to 1st Cousin Joe Napolitano!). IMHO listening to the official studio releases turned me on to them...the "live" official releases like "Europe '72" and "Live Dead", "Steal Your Face (I know, bad sound quality, chopped-up shows, etc.), along with the aforementioned SNR cemented it. Even before I actually saw them live, It was all over but the shouting. Still love 'em, and I actually enjoy them even more now without the "enhancements" I once enjoyed in my youth, LOL! Kind of like fine wine...they get better with age. Enjoy!

Cheers,

Kevin

P.S., Yes, of course I support "Jerry's Kids" by my blind, lemming-like reaction to everything the dead.net online store puts up for sale (music-wise, at least). These days you don't need crappy audience bootlegs, just pony-up the dosh and get the best-sounding stuff direct from the Dead, Inc., LOL!
hydrargyrum
Senior Member
Username: hydrargyrum

Post Number: 788
Registered: 3-2004
Posted on Wednesday, April 28, 2010 - 6:06 am:   Edit Post

D'oh,

Right you are Jeff. For some reason I was confusing Hundred Year Hall with Europe '72. Anyway, that's another good one.
tubeperson
Member
Username: tubeperson

Post Number: 91
Registered: 5-2005
Posted on Wednesday, April 28, 2010 - 6:33 am:   Edit Post

Peter, with respect to Dr. Who, I agree I am also a Tom Baker fan (isn't he the frind/foe of Mojo risin aka Jim Morrison of the Doors, featured so prominently in No One Here Gets Out Alive? Can't keep the scarf and jelly babies out of my mind. Pertwee was good but a little stiff. Baker has a good sense of humor and did not take himself too seriously, kind of like Roger Moore as Bond.

Speaking of the Dead, anyone take notice that Phil Less is now playing a 6 string Ritter? I own a different model Ritter. They are nice basses, but I still come back to my Alembics. Unfortunatley for me, Bass Central keeps selling the future targetted members of my Alembic clan before I can make the deal final.
funkyjazzjunky
Senior Member
Username: funkyjazzjunky

Post Number: 563
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Wednesday, April 28, 2010 - 9:27 am:   Edit Post

Man-O-Man

If it were not for Pandora.com I would be broke!

Checking out Jazz is Dead. Love Blues for Allah and Working Man's Dead.

I listen to any music with good musicians playing it: Jazz, Blues, Funk, pre-80's Rock

I have never heard any of this music. The only Dead tune I remember was Shades of Grey (which I did not really care for).

Thank you for getting me started!!
sonicus
Senior Member
Username: sonicus

Post Number: 878
Registered: 5-2009
Posted on Wednesday, April 28, 2010 - 10:02 am:   Edit Post

I was at the record release party for "Blues for Allah " @ the Great American Music Hall in San Francisco . Such memories !
benson_murrensun
Advanced Member
Username: benson_murrensun

Post Number: 260
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Wednesday, April 28, 2010 - 10:30 am:   Edit Post

If you want to hear jazzy Dead, listen to the stuff with Branford Marsalis sitting in (Bird Song, Eyes of the World).
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 4396
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Wednesday, April 28, 2010 - 10:32 am:   Edit Post

Wolf:

As I recall, I listened to it live while I was on the east coast visiting family. I always wished I could have been there. You lucky dawg!

Bill, tgo
sonicus
Senior Member
Username: sonicus

Post Number: 879
Registered: 5-2009
Posted on Wednesday, April 28, 2010 - 11:10 am:   Edit Post

Bill . it was really cool_____ There were huge quantities of living Crickets brought in to the basement that were set up with microphones for part of the live performance. I have more stories to tell about this experience, LOL !!!
edwin
Senior Member
Username: edwin

Post Number: 599
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Wednesday, April 28, 2010 - 12:29 pm:   Edit Post

I don't know if it's been mentioned here, but archive.org will stream most of the shows that the Dead ever played. If you want to hear the evolution of songs from 1968 to 1995, it's all there.

Nick, as far as I know, Alphonso played a Modulus. I saw Jazz is Dead a few times as I used to hang with Jimmy Herring a bit. It was great to meet those guys. Al and Billy Cobham were really nice guys and Vassar Clements played one of the show as well. I have some nice soundboards on DAT somewhere in my basement. Their take on the material was pretty interesting, although a lot of the details got left behind, mostly things you'd notice if you'd played it yourself. I'd don't know if I'd call it jazz per se, but it was a nice idea. I would like to hear Jimmy play in a more straight ahead setting.

I have never seen Al play an Alembic, but anything's possible! At one of the shows, Jimmy had a prototype of the Paul Reed Smith hollow body guitar that sounded great.
hifiguy
Advanced Member
Username: hifiguy

Post Number: 218
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Friday, April 30, 2010 - 12:36 pm:   Edit Post

I tend to like whole live discs rather than particular tunes - personal faves are the first of the "From the Vault" series, Europe '72 and Live Dead. The acoustic "Reckoning" is pretty sweet as well. But it's pretty hard to go wrong with anything recommended in this thread.
crobbins
Senior Member
Username: crobbins

Post Number: 597
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Saturday, May 01, 2010 - 7:30 am:   Edit Post

RIP Jerry and Marmaduke. :-(

(Message edited by CRobbins on May 01, 2010)
funkyjazzjunky
Senior Member
Username: funkyjazzjunky

Post Number: 564
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Monday, May 03, 2010 - 11:36 am:   Edit Post

The Live Dead and Dicks Picks are great. I have a number or new bass lines to learn.

Vann-Di
davehouck
Moderator
Username: davehouck

Post Number: 9270
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Monday, May 03, 2010 - 4:30 pm:   Edit Post

Regarding Phil Lesh's bass lines, before becoming a bass player Phil was studying avant-garde classical composition.
benson_murrensun
Advanced Member
Username: benson_murrensun

Post Number: 268
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Tuesday, May 04, 2010 - 9:43 am:   Edit Post

And playing the trumpet.
sonicus
Senior Member
Username: sonicus

Post Number: 974
Registered: 5-2009
Posted on Monday, May 24, 2010 - 5:02 pm:   Edit Post

I would like to add the release called " Grateful Dead 2/11/69 " to the list ; Live @ Fillmore East _______

Just _ Superb !
glocke
Senior Member
Username: glocke

Post Number: 729
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Tuesday, May 25, 2010 - 5:07 pm:   Edit Post

What do you get when you give a classically trained trumpet player acid?


Phil Lesh of course!!
davehouck
Moderator
Username: davehouck

Post Number: 9338
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Tuesday, May 25, 2010 - 5:13 pm:   Edit Post

Unbroken Chain
pace
Senior Member
Username: pace

Post Number: 548
Registered: 4-2004
Posted on Tuesday, May 25, 2010 - 5:32 pm:   Edit Post

NEW POTATO CABOOSE :-)

or worst case senario, WAVE TO THE WIND!!!!
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 4431
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Tuesday, May 25, 2010 - 7:38 pm:   Edit Post

Pride of Cucamonga!

Bill, tgo
benson_murrensun
Advanced Member
Username: benson_murrensun

Post Number: 280
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Wednesday, May 26, 2010 - 9:33 am:   Edit Post

Sea Stones
sonicus
Senior Member
Username: sonicus

Post Number: 1000
Registered: 5-2009
Posted on Wednesday, May 26, 2010 - 9:51 am:   Edit Post

I saw a live" Sea Stones" show once !

( this is my post#1000) lol_________
hieronymous
Senior Member
Username: hieronymous

Post Number: 777
Registered: 1-2005
Posted on Wednesday, May 26, 2010 - 3:10 pm:   Edit Post

"I saw a live "Sea Stones" show once!"

That is cool! Was it at a Dead show or something separate? One of the Dick's Picks sets from that period has a Sea Stones interlude...
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 4436
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Wednesday, May 26, 2010 - 3:13 pm:   Edit Post

Seastones was Phil and keyboardist Ned Lagin. I saw them with the Dead once or twice. Pretty weird album.

Bill, tgo
sonicus
Senior Member
Username: sonicus

Post Number: 1002
Registered: 5-2009
Posted on Wednesday, May 26, 2010 - 6:16 pm:   Edit Post

hieronymous,
It was just "Sea Stones", ______ with, _____ if I remember correctly
a guest or two besides Phil & Ned. It was at The Palace of Fine Arts/ Exploritorium Theatre. I went with some friends one of who was taking a few drum lessons from Mickey Hart. We were able to get in back stage for a few minutes and Phil was doing Bio-feedback before the show so I was ask not to interrupt him because ____________ I was Always the Kid with TOO many Questions _ LOL __ LOL __

Sonic Regards Again !!!!!!!!! lol
hieronymous
Senior Member
Username: hieronymous

Post Number: 778
Registered: 1-2005
Posted on Wednesday, May 26, 2010 - 7:24 pm:   Edit Post

I have/had a book of essays on the Dead that had a very interesting interview with Ned Lagin. He seems to be a mysterious figure in the Dead family/story.

I like the live version of Sea Stones on that Dick's Picks I mentioned (Volume 12 from Providence, RI & Boston Garden, 1974) - it doesn't resemble the album much at all - boy, I'm going to have to see if I can dig it out!

Wolf, did the concert sound like the album or was it louder?
sonicus
Senior Member
Username: sonicus

Post Number: 1005
Registered: 5-2009
Posted on Wednesday, May 26, 2010 - 7:38 pm:   Edit Post

It was so long ago that I really do not remember that much from the actual concert at the moment. HOWEVER , I will focus on that aspect of my memories of the occasion and post if more comes back to me.
sonicus
Senior Member
Username: sonicus

Post Number: 1006
Registered: 5-2009
Posted on Thursday, May 27, 2010 - 3:40 am:   Edit Post

hieronymous & all others interested
After some thought & recollection & focus____
The show that I was at I believe was 11/28/73@ The Palace of Fine Arts / Exploritorium Theatre. I may have other content/files (somewhere) There is a variety of content in this link from other shows as well BUT _ it is all good to MY ears and it is now available here; ( I like it )
http://www.archive.org/details/gd73-11-28.sbd-seastones.finney.968.sbefail.shnf

Sonic Regards ________________
hieronymous
Senior Member
Username: hieronymous

Post Number: 779
Registered: 1-2005
Posted on Thursday, May 27, 2010 - 9:19 am:   Edit Post

Thanks!!! Looking forward to checking that out!

And to try and keep on-topic, Sea Stones is probably NOT a good place to start with the Dead unless you are into avant-garde 20th century electronic music. But if you are into avant-garde 20th century music, then the Dead certainly has a lot to offer! For example, check out "The Other One" from Anthem of the Sun, which is made up of a whole bunch of live performances edited together and even has a prepared piano interlude.
funkyjazzjunky
Senior Member
Username: funkyjazzjunky

Post Number: 574
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Thursday, May 27, 2010 - 9:31 am:   Edit Post

Thankfully, Pandora and XM-Sirius have Dead Channels. The bass player does not play as does the typical rock bassist.
sonicus
Senior Member
Username: sonicus

Post Number: 1008
Registered: 5-2009
Posted on Thursday, May 27, 2010 - 9:33 am:   Edit Post

Oh yes " Anthem of the Sun" I first heard that around 1971 or so ______ I was still in High School .
benson_murrensun
Advanced Member
Username: benson_murrensun

Post Number: 281
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Thursday, May 27, 2010 - 10:44 am:   Edit Post

I only mentioned Sea Stones in answer to the question, "What do you get when you give a classically trained trumpet player acid?". I agree that it is likely NOT a good place to start listening to the Dead. Personally, I got started on the Dead with the Skullf*ck album, and I would recommend that because it has both tight, concise rockers as well as extended jamming. It is still one of my favorite albums even though Mickey Hart is not on it.
hieronymous
Senior Member
Username: hieronymous

Post Number: 780
Registered: 1-2005
Posted on Thursday, May 27, 2010 - 4:02 pm:   Edit Post

Yeah, sorry to jump on the Sea Stones thing - I love that stuff, so I couldn't help it! Definitely my favorite Dead stuff is around '74 with just Bill Kreutzmann - the few shows without Donna are even better! ;)
glocke
Senior Member
Username: glocke

Post Number: 731
Registered: 9-2002
Posted on Friday, May 28, 2010 - 4:22 am:   Edit Post

"The bass player does not play as does the typical rock bassist."

Nope...Phil is pretty unique. A long time ago he was actually what sealed it for me in terms of bass being the instrument I wanted to learn, especially the europe '72 album and some of the other shows from that tour.

OP: If you, you can send me a hard drive and Ill return it filled with a ton of GD material.
Check out this show:

http://www.archive.org/details/gd72-05-03.sbd.samaritano.21923.sbeok.shnf

the whole show is great but everything from truckin on is amazing...there is even a rare, but brief bass solo in there..

(Message edited by glocke on May 28, 2010)
funkyjazzjunky
Senior Member
Username: funkyjazzjunky

Post Number: 575
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Tuesday, June 01, 2010 - 7:48 am:   Edit Post

Greg,

Thank you for the offer.

All,

Thanks to all of you for the tips. How come the only Dead tune I heard was the Shades of Gray? It seems to be their biggest hit but does not sound as artful musically as what I am listening to now.

VMG
cozmik_cowboy
Senior Member
Username: cozmik_cowboy

Post Number: 723
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Tuesday, June 01, 2010 - 1:35 pm:   Edit Post

You're mistaken, Vann-Di. "Touch of Gray" wasn't their biggest hit; it was their only hit! And no, it isn't my favorite, either. Also, many Deadheads (myself among them) consider it being a hit to have ruined the whole thing, as it packed the shows with large numbers of people who had no idea of what the Dead were about & no respect for the unique atmoshpere involved.

Peter
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 4446
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Tuesday, June 01, 2010 - 2:44 pm:   Edit Post

As I recall, Truckin' & Casey Jones received enough airplay to qualify as minor "hits", though not nearly as much as Touch of Grey. And I agree with Peter. I guess for me the scene really changed when I looked around and saw all these people wearing tie-dye who related to Vietnam like I related to WWII ... something that happened long before I was born. I sure do miss it.

Bill, tgo
benson_murrensun
Advanced Member
Username: benson_murrensun

Post Number: 282
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Tuesday, June 01, 2010 - 2:49 pm:   Edit Post

I get a perverse kind of kick out of the fact that the Dead were one of the highest selling concert draws of all time, and had no real hits. There is hope for humanity...
lbpesq
Senior Member
Username: lbpesq

Post Number: 4447
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Tuesday, June 01, 2010 - 4:20 pm:   Edit Post

Not that they track this sort of thing, but while the Dead consistently sold high numbers of tickets, if you compared the number of individuals who attended their concerts to other bands, they would be a bit further down the list. If the Dead did a three night stand, it was not unusual for many in the audience to attend all three nights. I remember them playing five night stands in the Bay Area and personally attending four or five out of five. There are few bands that could claim this type of repeat audience ... and the few that can are almost all Dead-inspired.

Bill, tgo
mc500
New
Username: mc500

Post Number: 8
Registered: 11-2009
Posted on Tuesday, June 01, 2010 - 4:26 pm:   Edit Post

Funkyjazzjunky, You have been given some terrific advice. Please do us a favor and listen to a good sounding version of "Eyes Of The World". I would love to know what you think. Sadly, I am not much of a jazz fan but EOTW is one of my favorite songs of all time and may qualify to some as jazz.
sonicus
Senior Member
Username: sonicus

Post Number: 1025
Registered: 5-2009
Posted on Tuesday, June 01, 2010 - 8:31 pm:   Edit Post

I like an extended jam that morphs from "Eyes of the World" to "What's Going On" and back again _______
pace
Senior Member
Username: pace

Post Number: 553
Registered: 4-2004
Posted on Wednesday, June 02, 2010 - 6:51 am:   Edit Post

Thanks for posting that link to Seastones, Wolf!

"What's Going On" is so similar to "Eyes", that we would swap one out of our setlist for the other depending on our mood.... We felt that stringing them along in a sandwich was too static...
sonicus
Senior Member
Username: sonicus

Post Number: 1027
Registered: 5-2009
Posted on Wednesday, June 02, 2010 - 8:42 am:   Edit Post

I am happy you like it , you are very welcome.

(Message edited by sonicus on June 02, 2010)
benson_murrensun
Advanced Member
Username: benson_murrensun

Post Number: 283
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Wednesday, June 02, 2010 - 10:32 am:   Edit Post

I am one of those that would attend all the shows the Dead gave in my area, three nights in a row or whatever. They very rarely played the same song twice in a 3-night stand. It was hell on my accrued vacation time but it was worth it. I especially enjoyed the shows at Red Rocks!
cozmik_cowboy
Senior Member
Username: cozmik_cowboy

Post Number: 725
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Wednesday, June 02, 2010 - 12:30 pm:   Edit Post

"To make music for dancers like these is the rarest honor - to be coresponsible for what really is the dance of the cosmos. If, as some savants or consciousness suggest, we are actually agreeing to create, from moment to moment, everything we perceive as real, then it stands to reason that we're also responsible for keeping it going in some harmonious manner. The fervent belief we shared then, and that perseveres today, is that the energy liberated by this combination of music and ecstatic dancing is somehow making the world better, or at least holding the line against the depredations of entropy and ignorance."

Phil Lesh, Searching For The Sound: My Life With the Grateful Dead (New York, Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 2005), 69.

And the kids (and old farts) dance and shake their bones.......

Peter (and RIP Vince Welnick, 4 years today)
sonicus
Senior Member
Username: sonicus

Post Number: 1077
Registered: 5-2009
Posted on Sunday, June 20, 2010 - 11:42 am:   Edit Post

http://www.deadsymphony.com/

I have it & I give this a VERY high rating ! I LOVE it ___________

Sonic Regards ______________
davehouck
Moderator
Username: davehouck

Post Number: 9404
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Sunday, June 20, 2010 - 4:06 pm:   Edit Post

Interesting Wolf. The sampler certainly sounds intriguing.
funkyjazzjunky
Senior Member
Username: funkyjazzjunky

Post Number: 591
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Wednesday, July 14, 2010 - 8:25 am:   Edit Post

I did pretty good (if I do say so my self)

The songs are very interesting and while I did not get to solo, I still loved playing the unique bass style and lines.

I wanted to thank you all for helping to get me up to speed.
edwin
Senior Member
Username: edwin

Post Number: 682
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Wednesday, July 14, 2010 - 10:47 am:   Edit Post

Were you learning this stuff for a gig? I've played all kinds of music in the past (rock, funk, some jazz, singer/songwriter, avant garde, etc.) but find myself in a GD cover band to help with the bills these days. Lots of room for self-expression!
afrobeat_fool
Advanced Member
Username: afrobeat_fool

Post Number: 222
Registered: 7-2009
Posted on Wednesday, July 14, 2010 - 12:11 pm:   Edit Post

Edwin, you are in a GD cover band now? Which one?
edwin
Senior Member
Username: edwin

Post Number: 683
Registered: 5-2002
Posted on Wednesday, July 14, 2010 - 12:43 pm:   Edit Post

It's called Shakedown St. Of course, there is probably a Shakedown St. in every state!
afrobeat_fool
Advanced Member
Username: afrobeat_fool

Post Number: 223
Registered: 7-2009
Posted on Wednesday, July 14, 2010 - 1:45 pm:   Edit Post

There is now!:-)

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